An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People With Disabilities 2020

An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People with Disabilities 2020.

An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People With Disabilities 2020

I have always seen the world a little bit differently. When I was four years old, I could name the catalogue number of every Thomas the Tank Engine die cast model. I have Autism, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia.

For most part, I was a happy child and I did not really realise that I was significantly different from everyone else. This started to change as I got older and found myself having to overcome more and more barriers and I found that I was being bullied on a regular basis. Although I did not realise it, I was a victim of disability Hate Crime.

One of the most notable examples was when I started secondary school.  l travelled to school by bus, first with my mother and then later on my own. This was the first time I had ever used a bus on a regular basis. Unfortunately, I would face bulling on a daily basis. I was very tall for my age and they started to call me Lenny – after the character from the John Steinbeck book “Of Mice and Men”. In the book, Lenny is a giant man with learning disabilities. I had not read the book myself at this point and I only realised the context several years later, when I studied the book myself for my GCSE English Literature exam and it was extremely upsetting.

I also remember a particularly unpleasant image being placed in my backpack by an older student which was only discovered by my mother that evening. I would also have things thrown at me and bags would be placed over spare seats, to make sure I could not sit down. In one particularly unpleasant incident a stone was thrown at the window of the bus where I was sitting. As I got older I found myself masking more and more as I was so anxious about being bullied.

I didn’t realise at the time that I was victim of Hate Crime. Even when I reported the issue to the school nothing really changed. I did not know who else I could speak to. In the end I stopped getting the bus to school and at one stage refused to travel on a bus for any reason.

Last month we marked the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act. For the first time it was made unlawful in UK law to discriminate against people, in respect of their disabilities in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. While it is right that we recognise the progress which has been made since then, it is clear that there is still a long way to go.

The social model of disability says that people are disabled by barriers in society, not by their differences. For example, if a wheelchair user was unable to access a building due to stairs, it would be the stairs which are disabling them.

Hate Crime is one of the barriers disabled people face. The tragedy of Fiona Pilkington and Francecca Hardwick puts this into sharp focus. Francecca had a learning disability and the family had been targeted by a group of local teenagers for over a decade. Their home had been pelted with stones, eggs and flower and they faced constant abuse. On 23rd October 2007, Fiona drove Francecca to a secluded lay-by where she poured petrol over the backseat and set the car on fire. Fiona mentioned the gang in a suicide note to her mother. “The street kids, well I have just given up, I am just not cut out to take this much harassment.”.

We have also seen an increase in Disability Hate Crime due to the Covid pandemic. Many disabled people are exempt from wearing face masks and this means many disabled people receive abuse. Disabled people have also received abuse online and have faced suggestions that they should be locked up to stop spreading the virus.

Quite simply, Hate Crime is one of the barriers that creates disability.  I have just turned 30. I graduated from university in 2013 and I have since established a successful career in the equality sector. I am now working for Stop Hate UK, as their Community Engagement Worker, in the London Borough of Sutton. Disabled people have so much potential but it is only by removing these societal barriers that society will accept and appreciate the contribution of disabled people. To make this possible we need to be able to live without fear or abuse.

If you witness or experience Disability Hate Crime you can report it to Stop Hate UK 24/7 on 0800 1385 1625.

Please click here for the areas we cover.

Stop Hate UK – Stop Hate UK – Response to Baroness Lawrence Report

Stop Hate UK – Response to Baroness Lawrence Report

The recent report by our Patron, Baroness Lawrence, into how ‘structural racism’ has contributed to the disproportionate impact of the Coronavirus pandemic, upon on Black and Asian communities, has received much media attention this week.

In her report, Baroness Lawrence said these groups were “over-exposed”, faced “barriers” to healthcare and had also been scapegoated for Covid’s spread.

Prior to the report’s publication, a government adviser claimed that “structural racism” was not in itself a “reasonable explanation” for infection rates differing between ethnic groups and also suggested that focusing on other factors like people’s jobs and housing conditions would be more helpful; whilst another said that higher transmission rates among BAME group were more likely to be down to “a range of socio-economic and geographical factors”,

We support the claims by Baroness Lawrence, that these communities “have been over-exposed, under-protected, stigmatised and overlooked during this pandemic – and that this has been generations in the making.”

Systematic racism is, sadly, still entrenched within our society and it is undeniable that this is likely to have led to the effects outlined in her report.

As Baroness Lawrence goes on to say, “The impact of Covid is not random, but foreseeable and inevitable, the consequence of decades of structural injustice, inequality and discrimination that blights our society.”

The report also says that BAME workers ‘were more likely than white people to work in “frontline” jobs and come into contact with coronavirus’ and, when accessing healthcare, there was a “lack of cultural and language-appropriate communication”, with patients “not being taken seriously when presenting with symptoms.” BAME people were also “under-represented across the senior leadership of the NHS”.

Commissioned by Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer, in April, the report goes on to state that BAME communities had “also been subject to disgraceful racism as some have sought to blame different communities for the spread of the virus” and calls on ministers to outline a plan to tackle the rise in Hate Crime, with party leaders “issuing a joint statement condemning attempts to pit communities against one another”.

At Stop Hate UK, we see the damage caused by Hate, discrimination and prejudice and we understand the issues that these and many other underrepresented groups face every single day.

We are doubly concerned when we hear that these issues also affect the impact of the pandemic upon BAME communities and that there are ‘barriers’ to people accessing the healthcare and help that they need.

Baroness Lawrence’s report has received much attention, and also attracted some criticism, however, from our professional experience, the situation she describes is very much real and we applaud not only the commissioning of the report, but also Baroness Lawrence’s brave and thorough review in highlighting the real issues facing minority groups at these very difficult and challenging times.

To find out more about the work of Stop Hate UK and how you can help, visit www.stophateuk.org

You can read Baroness Lawrence’s Full Report Here: https://www.lawrencereview.co.uk/

Stop Hate UK – Comment on 2019-20 Hate Crime Figures

Stop Hate UK – Comment on 2019-20 Hate Crime Figures

National Hate Crime Awareness Week is always a timely reminder of one of the reasons why the week exists, when the annual Home Office Hate Crime statistics are released.

Sadly, but unsurprisingly, this year’s stats show another rise in the overall number of hate crimes recorded by police in England and Wales – to its highest overall number since records began in 2011/12 – with racially motivated offences rising by more than 4,000 in a year.

Official figures show 105,090 hate crimes were recorded in 2019/20, which is a rise of 8%, compared with 97,446 offences in 2018/19.

According to Home Office data, race Hate Crimes accounted for almost three out of four recorded offences (72%), equating to 76,070 offences, a rise of 6% since 2018/19.

It is of particular note that, this year, a separate report has also been published by the government department, looking specifically at the trends during the Coronavirus pandemic, which warned that rises in racially or religiously aggravated Hate Crime in June were a third higher than the previous year and remained high in July.

The provisional findings has suggested that this is “likely to be related to the Black Lives Matter protests and far-right groups’ counter-protests in England and Wales following the killing of George Floyd, in the United States of America, on 25th May 2020.

The main Hate Crime figures also show that offences motivated by sexual orientation, rose by 19% to 15,835 in 2019/20, from 13,314 a year earlier, whilst Transgender identity hate crime went up 16% in the same period, from 2,183 to 2,540, reaching its highest level since records began in 2011/12 (296).

Disability Hate Crime increased by 9% from 7,786 to 8,469, which is also a record high.

The report puts the rise in Hate Crime over the last five years down to “improvements in crime recording by the police” but also recognised that there had been spikes in reports following events like the EU Referendum in 2016 and the 2017 terror attacks.

In fact, the only decrease in Hate Crime incidents, of any kind, occurred in Religious motivations fell by 5%, from a peak of 7,203 the previous year to 6,822 – the first drop since 2012/13, which is actually a surprise to Stop Hate UK, considering the feedback and dialogue we have with many faith groups and is also somewhat at odds with information gathered for the all-party parliamentary group for British Sikhs, organised by the Sikh Federation (UK) and the Sikh Network.

It focused on the network’s new Sikh Manifesto, which reported that anti-Sikh Hate has not been adequately acknowledged by the government and found that the number of crimes reported has risen by 60 per cent in the last 12 months, despite no government support to increase reporting.

Commenting on the Hate Crime figures as a whole our Chief Executive, Rose Simkins, had the following to say; “The rising figures are likely to be a combination of a rise in crimes and a rise in people coming forward to report them.

What we know from talking to people is that many are still not reporting these crimes and these figures still do not represent a true depiction or the scale of the full picture.

Some people call us and say they don’t want to go to the police or think they will be too busy to deal with it, so there are still a lot of people still suffering in silence. We want all those directly and indirectly affected to feel comfortable in reporting Hate Crimes, even if they believe nothing can or will be done because, if anything, it helps us to understand the extent of the problem.”

Rose also added that BAME and LGBT communities, and people with disabilities, in particular, had a ‘right to know’ how big the problem was, saying;

“The increased debate around trans issues and the recent controversy surrounding some ‘high profile’ people’s views on transgender issues, are most certainly contributing factors to the sharp rise in Transphobia, which is very worrying.

It is no huge surprise that racism accounts for almost 75% of offences as, in recent years, it has dominated police and our own reports. Sadly, many people use public debates – such as the discussion around gender identity and the Black Lives Matter movement – to be hostile and say hurtful things.”

It’s also a real worry to Stop Hate UK, that some families have reported that they were actually too scared to sit in their gardens, play with their children outside or put the bins out after experiencing intimidating behaviour from neighbours – and some people have felt unable to escape abuse in areas still subject to lockdown restrictions, which is potentially set to rise again now it looks like a second wave of the pandemic is upon us.

During the initial lockdown (which is the period covered by the separate report) incidents have included verbal slurs, being coughed at in the street and banging on walls or windows, with fears from some that such incidents may have been prompted by a backlash to the Black Lives Matter protests.

In summary, whilst we always welcome the publishing of these ‘official’ statistics and we agree that a certain amount of the increases can be attributed to ‘improvements in Hate Crime recording by the Police’. However, we also know that these numbers do not represent the full picture of the problem of Hate in the UK and that we still have much to do.

We also agree with the Home Office, when they say that “those who commit “hateful attacks should feel the full force of the law”.

To find out more about the work Stop Hate UK do and how you can make a difference, visit www.stophateuk.org or email info@stophateuk.org

Stop Hate UK Helpline launches in Croydon

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of its 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service in Croydon, South London.

Commenting on the launch of service, Cllr Hamida Ali, Cabinet Member for Safer Croydon and Communities, said:

There is no place for Hate Crime in Croydon and tackling all forms of Hate Crime is a priority in our Community Safety Strategy. We know that too many people tolerate hate crime as a reality of life and don’t always report their experiences. We really welcome the availability of the Stop Hate UK Helpline for Croydon residents and encourage anyone experiencing any form of abuse, because of who they are, to come forward and seek support.”

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK, said: “All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and some individuals and people and people and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, including all our range of reporting channels, gives all those directly affected by and witnesses of Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.

Rose continued:

We are able to support people who feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. Sadly the occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with the council, statutory and community bodies, we can help to make a difference in Croydon.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. The charity can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. Service users with Hearing Impairments can report via interactive BSL by clicking the link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

Stop Hate UK is a national charity that provides independent and confidential support to people who are affected by all forms of Hate Crime. The Stop Hate Line is Stop Hate UK’s Hate Crime reporting and support helpline. Anyone in Croydon can contact the Stop Hate Line to talk about how they have been directly or indirectly affected by Hate Crime.

The charity, whose Patron is Baroness Doreen Lawrence of Clarendon OBE, of Clarendon in the Commonwealth Realm of Jamaica, and ambassadors are Canon Mark Oakley of St John’s College, Cambridge and Great Britain athlete Adrian Derbyshire set up the Stop Hate Line in 2006 in direct response to Recommendation 16 of the Macpherson Report (the enquiry into the handling of the death of Stephen Lawrence) states that victims and witnesses should be able to report Hate Incidents 24 hours a day and to someone other than the police.

Report Hate Crime in Lewisham

Stop Hate UK Helpline launches in Lewisham

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of its 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service in the London Borough of Lewisham. The service has been entirely funded by donations to the charity itself and is actually a ‘lifetime gift’ to the borough, from the charity, in recognition of 4 key factors:

  • Stop Hate UK’s close connection with The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust
  • As a thank you to Baroness Lawrence and recognition of her continued support for Stop Hate UK as its Patron
  • On 1st October 2020 we will be opening our first Stop Hate UK London office based at The Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust in Lewisham
  • 2020 marking Stop Hate UK’s 25th anniversary of our work to tackle Hate Crime

Commenting on the launch of service, Councillor Brenda Dacres, Cabinet Member for Safer Communities, said:

On the 25th Anniversary of Stop Hate UK, it is an honour for Lewisham to be the home of the helpline being launched today. In Lewisham, we are proud of our diversity and we stand shoulder to shoulder against all forms of Hate Crimes. Stop Hate UK has provided invaluable services; supporting and assisting victims of all forms of discrimination and Hate Crimes. The 24-hour/7 days a week helpline service will be instrumental on expanding that support, being available whatever the time and wherever we are. We are also delighted to be able to work even closer with the Stop Hate UK Team and Baroness Lawrence.”

Lewisham Metropolitan Police Service – Tara Duffy, SE BCU Hate crime coordinator and Faith liaison officer, said:

“We are delighted that the Stop Hate UK helpline has been launched in Lewisham, on this its 25th Anniversary. I am pleased that the residents of Lewisham will a have access to a service that will listen, provide advice and support, and help to explore what to do next. We recognise that not everyone wants, or is able, to report hate crimes directly to the police. Therefore, we really welcome the support Stop Hate UK can provide our communities here in Lewisham. We want to make sure that Lewisham continues to be a welcoming and safe borough for everyone. Much work has been undertaken in partnership with Lewisham Local Authority to reassure and address the concerns for our communities. However, there is still much work to do to tackle Hate Crime. Monitoring tensions and reducing hate crime is a work in progress, as we identify ongoing problems and deal with them head on.”

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK, said: Stop Hate UK is immensely proud to be able to make this gesture to Lewisham, as we have so many strong links with the borough, and it forms a key part of marking our 25th anniversary in tackling Hate Crime. We know that all forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and people and communities are often reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, including all our range of reporting channels, gives those directly affected by or witness to a Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.”

Rose continued:

“We are able to support people who feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. Sadly the occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with our partners, we can help to make a difference in Lewisham.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. The charity can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. Service users with Hearing Impairments can also report via interactive BSL by clicking the link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

Stop Hate UK is a national charity that provides independent and confidential support to people who are affected by all forms of Hate Crime. The Stop Hate Line is Stop Hate UK’s Hate Crime reporting and support helpline. Anyone in Lewisham can contact the Stop Hate Line to talk about how they have been directly or indirectly affected by Hate Crime.

The charity, whose Patron is Baroness Doreen Lawrence of Clarendon OBE, of Clarendon in the Commonwealth Realm of Jamaica, and ambassadors are Canon Mark Oakley of St John’s College, Cambridge and Great Britain athlete Adrian Derbyshire set up the Stop Hate Line in 2006 in direct response to Recommendation 16 of the Macpherson Report (the enquiry into the handling of the death of Stephen Lawrence) states that victims and witnesses should be able to report Hate Incidents 24 hours a day and to someone other than the police.

For media enquiries, please email andy@stophateuk.org

Stop Hate UK’s 25th Anniversary

Call Hate Out

It’s time for young people to Call Hate Out.

Call Hate Out
Call Hate Out – a new confidential support service for young people, under 18, experiencing or witnessing a Hate Crime

Here at Stop Hate UK, we are very excited to announce the launch of a new Hate Crime helpline to provide a confidential 24-hr support service for young people, under the age of 18, experiencing or witnessing Hate Crime.

Whilst we are no strangers to supporting this age group, we feel that the time is right to launch a dedicated service for those 18 years and under and, thanks to support from the Building a Stronger Britain Together (BSBT) project, we are now ideally placed to launch the service to a much bigger geographical area.

The new helpline service – Call Hate Out™ – will launch in brand new areas for us but will also be an additional service for all the 20+ existing helpline areas and organisations, providing an exciting enhancement to better support areas with their own Hate Crime portfolio and strategy. The new areas in which Call Hate Out will operate are West and South Yorkshire, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire.

So, any young person in these areas who is a target or witness of a Hate Crime will have access to a service that will listen, provide advice and support and help explore what to do next.

Our Chief Executive, Rose Simkins, said; “This is a long-term commitment from Stop Hate UK and we hope it will help more young people get the support and advice they need.

Hate Crime can happen anywhere and we know there has been a big increase in online Hate, so Call Hate Out will provide young people with all the relevant online methods and platforms to report Hate Crime and get the help they need.

Our long-term vision for Call Hate Out is to add even more resources to support and grow this vital work.

Other parts of the BSBT project also sees us working in a collaborative partnership with The National Holocaust Centre, to educate 42 regional schools about the Holocaust and how to tackle anti-Semitism in today’s society.

For more information on the Call Hate Out service, including information about how you can get it in your area, or any other of Stop Hate UK’s work just contact info@stophateuk.org

Transatlantic Theatre Company Production to raise funds for Stop Hate UK

Liane Grant's remarkable writing debut returns to London in March 2019
Liane Grant’s remarkable writing debut returns to London in March 2019 and will raise money for Stop Hate UK.

Stop Hate UK is very proud to be associated with RoL’n Productions’ critically acclaimed play ‘Half Me, Half You’, which is soon to run at the Tristan Bates Theatre, in London’s Covent Garden.

The play is the remarkable writing debut of Liane Grant and explores the complex relationship of a married interracial couple – Jess and Meredith – in incredibly evocative times in the USA, at the start of the turbulent Trump era.

The play intertwines the couple weathering a wave of intolerance, discrimination and oppression that is sweeping the USA; then switches to 16 years later, where a biracial British teen, forced into American life, changes Meredith’s life forever, all in the wake of what turned out to be a second US civil war.

The production, which received rave reviews in its recent 2018 London and New York runs, will not only raise money for Stop Hate UK, but our very own Chief Executive, Rose Simkins, will be appearing on a Q&A session panel on the evening of 1st April, after that evening’s show.

The panel will be chaired by American writer and arts journalist, Terri Paddock and will also feature award winning actor/director, Maria Friedman.

We caught up with the play’s writer; Liane Grant, who told us “I am very excited to bring ’Half Me, Half You’ to the Tristan Bates Theatre and to be able to raise funds for such a vital organisation like Stop Hate UK.

“We are also thrilled that we have the opportunity to hold a Q&A after the show on Monday 1st April. We don’t just see it as a chance to talk about the play itself, but more importantly, to discuss how the play’s issues of racism in particular, but also homophobia and sexism, are resonating with the public at this moment in time. Many people want to make a positive difference but don’t know how to go about it. By having people in the arts industry and experts, such as Rose, contributing on the panel, and helping to guide us through open discussions, we can also focus on giving people more specific tools to effect change.”

Rose Simkins said, “We were absolutely delighted to be associated with such a powerful production and only too happy to be part of the play’s Q&A session. We wish Liane and all her cast and crew, the greatest success in the play’s up and coming run.”

The production previews from 26th March and runs until 6th April. More details can be found by visiting Tristan Bates Theatre or by going to Liane’s own website. You can also see the production’s flyer by clicking here.

Kick It Out

27,000 fans around the world show attitudes towards race inclusion in football.

In the largest recorded study of its kind, Kick It Out (www.kickitout.org), football’s equality and inclusion organisation, and live-score app, Forza Football (www.forzafootball.com), have released a report documenting global attitudes towards issues of racism in football.

With close to 27,000 respondents from 38 different countries, the data report reveals international attitudes towards some of the most significant issues of racial equality within the sport.Kick It Out

Key Findings

  • Globally, over half of football fans (54%) have witnessed racist abuse while watching a football game. Only 28% would know how to appropriately report such racist incidents.
  • In the UK, more than half of fans have witnessed racist abuse (50%), but less than half would know how to report it (40%). In the US, these figures are 51% and 28% respectively.
  • 61% of fans internationally would support points deductions for national or club teams whose fans are found guilty of racist abuse (for example, Chelsea having points deducted following their game in Paris in 2015).
  • Globally, 74% of fans want FIFA to consider previous racist abuse when awarding countries international tournaments. The hosts of the 2026 World Cup are in agreement, with 77% of Americans wanting this, 76% of Mexicans, and 77% of Canadians.
  • In Middle Eastern countries, 80% of fans support this view too. However, problematically ahead of the Qatar World Cup 2022, only 13% of fans from Arabic countries would know how to report incidents of racist abuse.
  • On average, 84% of fans would feel comfortable with a player of a different ethnic/racial background than them representing their nation or club team.
  • Fans in Norway (95%), Sweden (94%), and Brazil (93%) feel most comfortable with a player of different ethnic / racial background representing their national or club team. Fans in Saudi Arabia (11%), Lebanon (15%), and the UAE (19%) feel least comfortable.
  • When it comes to the countries housing the ‘Top 5’ European leagues, 93% of French people, 92% of Brits, 77% of Germans and Spaniards, and 71% of Italians feel comfortable with a player of different ethnic / racial background representing their national or club team. This figure for the US is 91%.

For more information go to: www.forzafootball.com

 

Lord Ouseley, Chair of Kick It Out, comments:

“The research is a timely reminder of both the progress that has been made in tackling racism in football, and the challenges that remain. There is clear global trend towards an acceptance of the BAME community’s central role in football, but further progress is unlikely to be made until governing bodies are bolder in their efforts to eradicate racism from every level.

“The governing bodies, including The FA, UEFA and FIFA, must do more to promote methods of reporting racism and they must listen to supporters’ demands – clubs or countries whose supporters are racially abusive should face harsher sanctions, including points deductions.”

 Patrik Arnesson, Founder and CEO of Forza Football, comments:

“One mission of our app is to give fans a powerful collective voice, when otherwise they might be ignored. This report shows a real appetite for meaningful change in footballing policy. Organisations such as FIFA need to take note of the number of fans advocating points deductions for incidents of racism, for example. Our data shows that the footballing world is modernising in relation to certain issues, but that there is also a long way to go.”

Christopher Dawes and Daniel Rubenson, Associate Professors in the Politics departments at New York and Ryerson University respectively, who provided methodological advice on the study, comment:

“This is a very impressive data collection effort and an important source of information on racial attitudes among football supporters. The scale of the survey, certainly one of the biggest of its kind, makes it particularly useful for comparing these attitudes across counties and regions.”

Extended Findings

  • A higher proportion of fans in Peru (77%), Costa Rica (77%), and Colombia (71%), have witnessed what they would classify as racist abuse while watching football matches, than in anywhere else in the world.
  • Countries with the smallest proportion of fans having witnessed what they would classify as racist abuse while watching football matches are the Netherlands (38%), Russia (41%), and Norway (43%).
  • In the UK, 54% of fans said they would support regulations to improve opportunities for ethnic / racial minority candidates applying for jobs at football clubs (which comes following similar legislation being brought in by the FA). This figure is 64% in the US, where what is known as the ‘Rooney Rule’ has been implemented along these lines.
  • In Germany and Switzerland, following controversies this summer relating to abuse aimed at Mesut Ozil and players of Albanian heritage representing the Swiss national team, nearly a quarter of fans from both countries would feel uncomfortable with a player of different ethnic / racial background representing their national or club teams (77% comfort for both).
  • Respondents from Ghana (83%), Colombia (77%), and Nigeria (75%) are most in favour of deducting points from teams whose fans commit racist abuse. Russian (34%), Ukrainian (42%), and Dutch (45%) fans are least in favour of such a policy.
  • Fans in Brazil (61%), Portugal (60%), and France (44%) feel most confident they would know how to report incidents of racist abuse. Fans in the UAE (9%), Ukraine (12%), and Egypt (12%) feel least confident.
Stop Hate UK Response to the latest Police Hate Crime figures

Stop Hate UK response to latest Hate Crime figures

Yesterday saw the release of the latest Hate Crime figures in England and Wales, issued by the Home Office.

The figures report an overall increase of 17% in overall reports of Hate Crime incidents, to a record high of 94,098, with over 75% classified as a “race hate”.

Sadly, but perhaps not surprisingly given the current political and social climate, there has also been a surge in the number of reports where the motivation of the perpetrator is an individual’s religious beliefs.

The report also shows that over half of all incidents of this kind were directed at Muslims.

Stop Hate UK’s own statistics, for the same period, reflect a similar pattern to those published today by the Home Office, in terms of the overall increase in reports and the motivations behind the incidents.

However, whilst we do agree that their is now a greater ‘willingness to report’ and the figures continue to be affected by ‘Brexit’, there is still much more we all need to do to tackle Hate Crime.

This is especially true as we prepare ourselves for the conclusion of ‘Brexit’ negotiations and the unknown outcomes that will doubtless affect the Hate Crime landscape further.

We must also do more to tackle incidents of online Hate, as the ever-changing patterns in our daily consumption of social media and other online platforms will only increase in the future.

To find out more about the work of Stop Hate UK visit www.stophateuk.org or email info@stophateuk.org

You can view the Home Office Hate Crime Report here.

 

 

Stop Hate UK – Response to HMIC Report

The recent report, issued by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabularies (HMIC), says that Police in England and Wales must tackle ‘significant problems’ in handling Hate Crime.

It’s a headline that makes people sit up and take notice and many are quick to criticise the authorities for not always getting things right in this area. However, there is a wider perspective that must be considered when looking at this potentially sensitive issue.

Whilst many of the UK’s Police forces have a Hate Crime strategy and defined strands of Hate Crime, there is still a lack of training and understanding about what Hate Crime is, the correct way to record the incidents and having the time, expertise and knowledge of how to respond to victims and witnesses.

We know that there is a great deal of inconsistency of the quality and quantity of training and we would like to see Hate Crime training prioritised – including refresher training – and checks to ensure that the message and policies are fully understood.

Our Police forces are already vastly overstretched and have had funding consistently cut for the last few years. However, if the report’s predicted trend in the rise of Hate Crime incidents does come to fruition in 2019, then those resources will be even more stretched to cope with any increase, no matter what the level.

It is, therefore, vital that the Police and authorities make use of the advice, support and training that is available to them from specialist 3rd party organisations, such as Stop Hate UK and that, collectively, we must adopt a collaborative approach to tackling Hate Crime.

Often, when people make their very first call to report or ask for advice regarding what could be perceived to be a Hate Crime or Hate Incident, that first conversation or point of contact is, arguably, their most vital conversation.

This is where 3rd party groups, organisations and charities provide such vital support to the Police. It is this specialist, expert advice that can often be the difference in how someone perceives their entire experience, in terms of the help they receive and their journey towards a resolution and/or outcome.

Stop Hate UK currently provide support to a number of the UK’s police forces and have developed many key relationships with other organisations during this time, proving that a collaborative effort is the key to tackling Hate Crime in our society, and that we are truly stronger together.

To find out more about Stop Hate UK, our training and support services and our work to assist in tackling Hate in our society, visit our website or search for our social media platforms.