Musician to become Ambassador to Stop Hate UK

Stop Hate UK is very proud to announce the appointment of a new Ambassador to the charity, in the form of musician, producer and record label owner Gary Powell.

Gary is best known as the drummer in The Libertines, with several critically acclaimed albums in his repertoire, but is also associated with several other acts, such as The Specials, Dirty Pretty Things, The New York Dolls and legendary reggae musician, Eddy Grant, as well as being the head of his own record label, 25 Hour Convenience Store and host to his own radio show on the digital community based radio station Boogaloo Radio.

He has, however, also become a well-respected anti-hate advocate and has been very vocal in his support for equality and his disdain for intolerance and discrimination in today’s society.

Speaking of the appointment, Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK said, “We are very happy to announce Gary’s appointment as an Ambassador to Stop Hate UK. We have a long-standing relationship with Gary and we know his passion for tackling hate and intolerance in society aligns with our own vision to live in a society that is free from hate, harassment and discrimination.

Gary added; “I was delighted and also honoured to be approached by Stop Hate UK. It’s no secret that I am very passionate about the need for all of us to be more tolerant and accept that diversity in society is what makes us truly great. Our willingness to appreciate and embrace our differences will define our future and make the world a better place to be.

Gary’s appointment as an Ambassador to Stop Hate UK is not only a great addition to Stop Hate UK’s already skilled and respected team, it comes off the back of Gary’s recent collaboration with New York visual artist Josh Klaw and veteran Hollywood TV writer Jim Martin to create a unique digital art experience; ‘THE INVASION OF…’  – based on a collision of parallel universes – currently being developed as a graphic novel and animated film that serve as companion pieces to his forthcoming debut solo album.

Find out more about Gary Powell on Twitter at @gdogg27 or on Instagram @gdogg27 or the_invasion_of

Stop Hate UK Helpline launches in Rossendale

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of its 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service in Rossendale.

Funding for the helpline has been provided by the Shiva Trust Charity who provides equal opportunities for the most marginalised in society and is a source of support for those affected, their families and their communities.

Speaking about the helpline, Anand Ennis-Cole of the Shiva Trust said: “We Invest in Equality and Diversity. We want to Stop Hate, which is a common enemy for the marginalised within society. Hate divides people and destroys communities.

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK, said: “All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and some people and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, including all our range of reporting channels, gives all those directly affected by and witnesses of Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.

Rose continued:

We are able to support people who may feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. The occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with the council, statutory and community bodies, we can help to make a difference.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. The charity can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. British Sign Language (BSL) users can report via the interactive BSL link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

Stop Hate UK is a national charity that provides independent and confidential support to people who are affected by all forms of Hate Crime. The Stop Hate Line is Stop Hate UK’s Hate Crime reporting and support helpline. Anyone in Rossendale can contact the Stop Hate Line to talk about how they have been directly or indirectly affected by Hate Crime.

Find out more about Stop Hate UK by clicking here

Recipes Against Racism

Recipes Against Racism – Charity Cookbook Launch

Stop Hate UK is delighted to be a part of the charity cookbook “Recipes Against Racism”, edited by Sachiko & Shu.

Their mission is to mobilise communities to collaborate in anti-racist activism through the alluring power of food.

Recipes Against Racism

In the UK there has been a near threefold increase in Hate Crimes against East and South East Asians since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Recipes Against Racism has its roots firmly planted in the London restaurant and food scene – a city that has been a diverse melting pot of so many cultural identities for hundreds of years. It brings together recipes from the best of London’s Asian and Asian-influenced restaurants, supperclubs and chefs, who responded with such enthusiasm to our call to action.

The recipes highlight the culinary and cultural diversity across Asia, which you will be able to experiment with from the comfort of your own home.

100% of proceeds from the cookbook are being donated to Stop Hate UK and End the Virus of Racism.

To get your copy of this fantastic cookbook click here.

Stop Hate Helpline Launches in Wandsworth

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of its 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service in the London Borough of Wandsworth.

Speaking about the programme Robyn Thomas, of Wandsworth Council’ Community Safety Department said:

“We are determined to make Wandsworth a safe borough for everyone and work with partners to do all we can to stamp out a crime that has such a devastating effect on victims, families and communities. 

“One of the most effective ways of stopping hate crime is to ensure all incidents are reported, which is why we are delighted to be working with Stop Hate to support people to speak out.”

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK, said: “All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and some people and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, including all our range of reporting channels, gives all those directly affected by and witnesses of Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.

Rose continued:

We are able to support people who may feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. The occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with the council, statutory and community bodies, we can help to make a difference in Wandsworth.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. The charity can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. British Sign Language (BSL) users can report via the interactive BSL link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

For more information about getting the helpline in your area click here to email us.

Hate Crime Reporting App launches in Merseyside

We are really pleased to announce that, from today (23rd March 2021), our brand new Hate Crime Reporting App will be available to use.

All residents and visitors to Merseyside can use the App to report all forms of Hate Crime and it is able to capture images, audio and video, to help provide the additional evidence needed to successfully investigate incidents.

See below to read our joint press release, with the Merseyside Police and Crime Commissioner:

Merseyside’s Police Commissioner Jane Kennedy has united with leading hate crime charity Stop Hate UK to launch the new app in Merseyside, with the aim of encouraging more victims of hate crime to come forward and boost confidence in reporting.

The new app helps those targeted because of their identity, and those who witness such incidents, to immediately report an incident in confidence and, if they wish, anonymously and without even speaking to anyone.

The app, which is free to download and available on both Apple and Android platforms, builds on the existing ways to report hate crime to Stop Hate UK, which includes by telephone, text and webchat. Users can upload audio, photographs and video materials as part of their report.

Users can also be immediately directed to the police in an emergency situation, as well as access information about hate crime support services working in Merseyside.

The new app was launched today at a virtual online hate crime awareness event being run by the Police Commissioner for 30 organisations across Merseyside. It is the fourth training session Jane Kennedy has run in the last five months, reaching nearly 120 organisations, with a further training session planned for 25th March.

Merseyside’s Police Commissioner Jane Kennedy said: “Merseyside is a region famous for its warm and friendly welcome – a welcome that extends to people from all races and faiths.

“To people of all abilities, sexual orientations and genders.

“Whether you are visiting for work or leisure or if Merseyside is your home, you should be able to live without fear. I want you to know that intolerant or hateful behaviour is not acceptable. No one should be subject to abuse, fear or hatred simply because of who they are.

“But hate crimes do happen and if it happens to you it is important that you help us to prevent it by reporting it. Don’t suffer in silence. It is not a normal part of life. We are making it as easy as possible for people who have experienced or witnessed a hate crime to report it and to get support if they need it.

“That’s why I am delighted to join Stop Hate UK to launch this hate crime reporting app. Stop Hate UK are completely separate from the police.  They are an independent charity. You can tell them what happened to you, or what you saw and heard happen to someone else, using this app in confidence and anonymously, if you wish. By downloading the app you are just a few steps away from talking to someone who understands and can help.

“Through a few quick taps on your phone you can report when an incident has happened and be directed immediately to support and help. You don’t even need to speak to anyone.

Hate crime is not acceptable. Please do not tolerate it as part of your life. Download the app and help us kick it out of Merseyside.”

Stop Hate UK’s Chief Executive Rose Simkins said:

“This is an exciting new service giving Merseyside residents and visitors greater choice to report Hate Crime. The new App complements existing helplines and other reporting channels and, by capturing pictures, audio and video of incidents, and can provide the additional evidence needed to successfully investigate incidents. The information in the App about Hate Crime and other partner agencies within Merseyside will also help people seek help as and when they are ready to do so – be that immediately after an incident or when they feel ready to do so.”

“We would like to thank Merseyside’s Police and Crime Commissioner for supporting the development of the App and for demonstrating their commitment to achieving sustainable Hate Crime services.”

Merseyside has commissioned Stop Hate UK since 2014 to provide an independent and alternative route to the police for reporting hate crime.

The App is available on Android and IOS platforms by going to Google Play or the Apple App Store and searching for ‘Stop Hate UK’.

Sutton Disability Hate Crime Questionnaire

Sutton Disability Hate Crime Questionnaire

We are pleased to launch our Sutton Disability Hate Crime questionnaire.

The purpose of this questionnaire is to invite disabled people to have their say, on the development of a Disability Hate Crime strategy, for the London Borough of Sutton.

The aim of the strategy is to reduce the gap between the number of Disability Hate Crimes, committed against people in Sutton, and the number of Disability Hate Crimes reported to the police.

We will be accepting questionnaire responses until 12th July 2021.

You can find the questionnaire here:

Alternatively, you can download and complete the survey and return to us via email to: kieran@stophateuk.org.

We also have an easy read version:

If you have any questions or need any assistance, please email kieran@stophateuk.org or call 07904 704834 during office hours.

You can also complete the questionnaire on the phone if you prefer.

Survey responses can also be sent by post to the following address:

Abu Ullah,

Hate Crime and Prevent Manager,

Sutton Police Station,

6 Carshalton Road,

SM1 4RF

We would like to thank Action Voices for designing the Easy Read version of the questionnaire and also thank the London Borough of Sutton and the Metopolitan Police for their ongoing support and commitment to tackling Hate Crime in Sutton.

Meet our LGBTQIA+

Meet our LGBTQIA+ Heroes

In celebration of LGBTQI+ History Month, we thought we would share with you some of our team’s LGBTQIA+ Heroes, past and present!

Our Online Services Manager, Bill Howe says ‘my LGBTQI+ hero is Claude Cahun (25 October 1894 – 8 December 1954). For me, the life of Claude Cahun, is the story of a revolutionary artistic vision, of courage and resistance, but also a story of lifelong love and creative partnership.

Bill Howe Stop Hate UK Online Services Manager

Lucy Renee Mathilde Schwob who adopted the ambiguously gendered pseudonym, Claude Cahun is now most widely best known for a series of elaborately staged photographic self-portraits produced in the 1920’s, and 30’s, in which Cahun assumed a variety of masculine, androgynous, and feminine personas. Claude Cahun is now considered to be a ground-breaking artist who fully embraced notions of gender fluidity long before the term came into use. In her autobiography, Disavowals, she explained:

“Masculine? Feminine? It depends on the situation.

 Neuter is the only gender that always suits me.”

Claude Cahun

In 1937 Cahun and lifelong partner, Suzanne Malherbe, who adopted the pseudonym, Marcel Moore settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they actively participated in the resistance and as propagandists, producing anti-German fliers which they often distributed while in disguise, until they were arrested by the Gestapo in 1944, escaping the death sentence when the island was liberated in 1945. Cahun died in 1954. and is buried in St Brelade’s Church, Jersey, alongside Marcel Moore.

In 2007, the late David Bowie said of Cahun:

 “You could call her transgressive or you could call her a cross dressing Man Ray with surrealist tendencies. I find this work really quite mad, in the nicest way. Outside of France and now the UK she has not had the kind of recognition that, as a founding follower, friend, and worker of the original surrealist movement, she surely deserves.”

 You can view examples of Cahun’s work here: http://www.artnet.com/artists/claude-cahun/


Grace, Education and Media Volunteer

Grace McIntosh, Education and Media volunteer says ‘my LGBTQI+ Hero is my flatmate Dom. Dom is a Trans Man and I am very proud of the courage it has taken him to come out to his friends and family who have received this in different ways, some not very accepting. Despite this he continues to inspire me every day to be unapologetically our true selves and for that, he is my hero.’

“He continues to inspire me everyday to be unapologetically our true selves and for that, he is my hero.”


Rebecca, Project Worker

Rebecca Parker, one of our Project Workers says that her LGBTQI+ hero is Marsha P. Johnson. Marsha was a key figure in the 1969 Stonewall Riots and dedicated her life to advancing LGBTQI+ rights through her activism. Alongside her advocacy around transgender rights and HIV/AIDS, Marsha also established a shelter for homeless LGBTQI+ youth and became a mother to her chosen family.

Marsha P. Johnson

“I find Marsha inspirational because she lived boldly and unapologetically, turning her anger into activism, and fighting for the rights of her community.”


Mike Ainsworth, Director of London Services, Stop Hate UK

Mike Ainsworth, our Director of London Services told us ‘my LGBTQ hero is Sue Sanders. We work together on the Independent Advisory Group on Hate Crime. Sue has been at the frontline of the fight for equality for over forty years but her ideas remain fresh, vibrant and challenging. She empowers me to look at the world differently and recognise inequality. She has been a leading equality advisor for years working with the Metropolitan Police and others.

Sue Sanders, Campaigner for Social Justice

Sue is a fearless campaigner for social justice and she has a clarity of vision that inspires me each time we work together.

In 2000 Sue founded Schools Out the leading LGBTQ organisation working in education and in 2004 she was the instigator of LGBT History Month. Sue strikes fear into those who promote inequality, she confronts those in power who fail to deliver justice and she challenges her allies to do more and work harder. She is a good person to know.”


Natalie Leal, Fundraising and Events Coordinator

Natalie Leal, Fundraising and Events Coordinator says…

“my LGBTQI+ Hero is Judith Butler, a queer Gender theorist who’s books influenced political philosophy, feminism and queer studies”.

Butler is best known for her theory in the 90’s on gender performativity which argued that gender is performative based on social conventions and norms as she spoke about “new possibilities for gender that contest the rigid codes of hierarchical binarisms”.

Judith Butler

Butler is an inspiration to me because her work has been pivotal in the LGBTQI+ movement, challenging oppressive attitudes, ideas and constructions around gender whilst championing the right for people to live freely and to be who they want to be. Judith has also served as the chair for the board of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission which is awesome”.


You can be an LGBTQI+ hero, don’t stand for LGBTQI+ hate and discrimination, report it!

Stop Hate UK Helpline launches in Camden

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of its 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service in the London Borough of Camden.

Commenting on the launch of the service in Camden, Councillor Abdul Hai, Cabinet Member for Young People, Equalities and Cohesion said: “We want Camden to be a safe, strong and equal place for everyone who lives, works and studies here. This is no place for hate.

“It is important to remember however that if you do witness harmful or hateful behaviour in our borough, or experience it yourself, there is help and support available.

“By reporting hateful behaviour when it happens to you, or when you see it happen to someone else, you may be able to help us stop others being targeted in the same way.

“We really welcome the arrival of the Stop Hate UK Helpline for our residents and encourage anyone experiencing any form of abuse because of who they are to come forward and seek support.”

“Sadly in a world where hate crime is still a huge challenge having an organisation like Stop Hate UK will help us tackle these dreadful crimes.”

Our own Chief Executive, Rose Simkins, said: “All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and some individuals and people and people and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, including all our range of reporting channels, gives all those directly affected by and witnesses of Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.

Rose continued:

We are able to support people who feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. Sadly the occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with the council, statutory and community bodies, we can help to make a difference in Camden.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. We can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. Service users with Hearing Impairments can report via interactive BSL by clicking the link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People With Disabilities 2020

An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People with Disabilities 2020.

An open and honest account from our Community Engagement Worker for International Day of People With Disabilities 2020

I have always seen the world a little bit differently. When I was four years old, I could name the catalogue number of every Thomas the Tank Engine die cast model. I have Autism, Dyslexia and Dyspraxia.

For most part, I was a happy child and I did not really realise that I was significantly different from everyone else. This started to change as I got older and found myself having to overcome more and more barriers and I found that I was being bullied on a regular basis. Although I did not realise it, I was a victim of disability Hate Crime.

One of the most notable examples was when I started secondary school.  l travelled to school by bus, first with my mother and then later on my own. This was the first time I had ever used a bus on a regular basis. Unfortunately, I would face bulling on a daily basis. I was very tall for my age and they started to call me Lenny – after the character from the John Steinbeck book “Of Mice and Men”. In the book, Lenny is a giant man with learning disabilities. I had not read the book myself at this point and I only realised the context several years later, when I studied the book myself for my GCSE English Literature exam and it was extremely upsetting.

I also remember a particularly unpleasant image being placed in my backpack by an older student which was only discovered by my mother that evening. I would also have things thrown at me and bags would be placed over spare seats, to make sure I could not sit down. In one particularly unpleasant incident a stone was thrown at the window of the bus where I was sitting. As I got older I found myself masking more and more as I was so anxious about being bullied.

I didn’t realise at the time that I was victim of Hate Crime. Even when I reported the issue to the school nothing really changed. I did not know who else I could speak to. In the end I stopped getting the bus to school and at one stage refused to travel on a bus for any reason.

Last month we marked the 25th Anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act. For the first time it was made unlawful in UK law to discriminate against people, in respect of their disabilities in relation to employment, the provision of goods and services, education and transport. While it is right that we recognise the progress which has been made since then, it is clear that there is still a long way to go.

The social model of disability says that people are disabled by barriers in society, not by their differences. For example, if a wheelchair user was unable to access a building due to stairs, it would be the stairs which are disabling them.

Hate Crime is one of the barriers disabled people face. The tragedy of Fiona Pilkington and Francecca Hardwick puts this into sharp focus. Francecca had a learning disability and the family had been targeted by a group of local teenagers for over a decade. Their home had been pelted with stones, eggs and flower and they faced constant abuse. On 23rd October 2007, Fiona drove Francecca to a secluded lay-by where she poured petrol over the backseat and set the car on fire. Fiona mentioned the gang in a suicide note to her mother. “The street kids, well I have just given up, I am just not cut out to take this much harassment.”.

We have also seen an increase in Disability Hate Crime due to the Covid pandemic. Many disabled people are exempt from wearing face masks and this means many disabled people receive abuse. Disabled people have also received abuse online and have faced suggestions that they should be locked up to stop spreading the virus.

Quite simply, Hate Crime is one of the barriers that creates disability.  I have just turned 30. I graduated from university in 2013 and I have since established a successful career in the equality sector. I am now working for Stop Hate UK, as their Community Engagement Worker, in the London Borough of Sutton. Disabled people have so much potential but it is only by removing these societal barriers that society will accept and appreciate the contribution of disabled people. To make this possible we need to be able to live without fear or abuse.

If you witness or experience Disability Hate Crime you can report it to Stop Hate UK 24/7 on 0800 1385 1625.

Please click here for the areas we cover.

Statement on Srebrenica Memorial Day 2020

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide, in which over 8,000 Muslim men and boys were murdered in the worst atrocity on European soil since the Second World War, simply because of their religious identity. As an organisation that works to eradicate hate and discrimination, we believe that we must ensure that we never forget about the genocide and reaffirm our commitment to standing up against all forms of hatred and prejudice that targets groups based on their religion, ethnicity, gender, sexuality or any type of difference.

The theme “Every Action Matters” seeks to encourage every person to reflect upon their own behaviour and choices that they make, and demonstrate that however insignificant it may seem, every action matters, whether positive or negative. It aims to show that those who stand up and unite against hatred can make a difference. It sets out to dispel the notion that one person cannot make a difference and show that the action of one individual does matter and that they can achieve a great deal, however small their action may appear initially. 

It is now more important than ever for us to come together as people in the UK, no matter what our background, to celebrate diversity and to stand together in solidarity against hatred and discrimination. We hope you will join us in mourning the loss of those who died at Srebrenica and reflecting on how we as individuals, groups and communities can come together to build a better future without hatred.