International Women’s Day – Rose Simkins

On International Women’s Day, we thought we’d take a look at our very own Chief Executive’s career, as she also celebrates over 10 years service with Stop Hate UK.

It was clear from an early age that Rose’s career path would take her down the charity route, as she completed her first fund raising event at the tender age of just 11!

However, these were different times and it was not the ‘norm’ for a young woman to pursue a university education, with a clear passion to make a difference to those in need – thankfully times have changed – and Rose was not to be deterred from her aspirations.

During her years with Stop Hate UK, Rose has been at the helm as the charity has gone through many changes, leading Stop Hate UK to be the now nationally recognised voice on all forms of Hate Crime.

Rose is passionate about what she does and what she stands for, making her a very valuable asset to the work of Stop Hate UK.

So we’d like to highlight Rose’s achievements on International Women’s Day, as Stop Hate UK continues to provide help, support, assistance and guidance to all those directly or indirectly affected by incidences of Hate Crime.

You can find out more about Rose by clicking on the links below:

https://www.stophateuk.org/rose-simkins-chief-executive-of-stop-hate-uk-biography/

https://www.stophateuk.org/training-chief-executive/

Well done Rose – a true inspiration on International Women’s Day!

Stop Hate UK T-shirts available now!

Stop Hate UK T-Shirts - Now in stockDue to popular demand, Stop Hate UK T-shirts are back!

That’s right, our fab new white cotton t-shirts have just arrived, featuring our colour logo and ‘Stop Hate. Start Here.’ branding, together with the hashtag ‘#NoPlaceForHate’, they’re a great way to show your support for our work and spread the word!

Available (initially) in sizes Large and XL, for £10.95 including postage and packing, they make a great gift for a loved one, friend or relative, just in time for Christmas, or just as a treat for yourself.

You’ll soon be able to buy them directly from our website, along with some other great Stop Hate merchandise, but you can pre-order yours now by emailing info@stophateuk.org with your details and order.

Thanks in advance for your support!

 

Politicians: Polarising Language could lead to Legitimised Hate

We thought we’d share this BBC article that has urged politicians to avoid using polarising language, when campaigning on political issues, as it could lead to “legitimised hate”.

Stop Hate UK are in agreement with the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s concerns that the language used, particularly in the run up to the EU Referendum vote, definitely fuelled the divisive tensions in our society.

The article (and commission) cited the terrible events that led to the killing of both Arkadiusz Jozwick and those leading to the death of MP Jo Cox, as examples of such tensions reaching a tragic peak.

The commission, which is an independent statutory body actually picks out the ‘Brexit’ vote as the defining moment, saying that while the economic implications of the vote were of great importance to the people and the country as a whole, it also noted that there should be “discussion on what values we hold as a country” and criticises the government’s aborted plan for companies to set out the proportion of foreign people they intend to employ.

Like Stop Hate UK, the commission welcomed the government’s Action on Hate Crime.

It’s been 5 months now since ‘Brexit’ and much has been said; and there’s doubtless much still to be said, but if the people who are tasked with, or involved in the running of the country are seen to be using ‘inflammatory’ language in campaigning, debate or in rhetoric, then what message does it send to the public?

There is no coincidence between the use of much more direct language, like those seen during the EU Referendum (from both sides) and the apparent legitimisation of what is effectively ‘Hate Speech’.

Stop Hate UK welcomes the intimation in this article and hopes that politicians and the like, take heed of its concerns.

Stop Hate UK Shortlisted for Helpline Award!

We’re very pleased to announce that we’ve just found out we’ve been nominated for a Helpline Partnership Helpline Award 2016.

It’s always fantastic news to be shortlisted for an award, and particularly pleasing when it’s recognition from within the industry.

The awards take place on Friday November 4th at the De Vere West One Hotel, in London, as part of the Helplines Partnership Annual Conference and Awards Ceremony and feature two amazing keynote speakers, in Simon Weston CBE and Carol Smith from The Royal British Legion – so we really are in good company.

The judging panel is made up of Detective Inspector Benjamin Loose (Kent Police), Jo Clark (Paramedic), Paul Joseph (Missing People) and Faye McGuinness (Mind).

Obviously we are thrilled to be shortlisted and we’ll have our fingers firmly crossed until the 4th November and thanks to everyone who nominated Stop Hate UK for this award – we really do appreciate your support!

Helpline Awards Panel

National Hate Crime Awareness Week Poster

We are pleased to attach the official National Hate Crime Awareness Week poster, giving more details of the launch event at St Paul’s Cathedral, on Saturday 8th October 2016. Please feel free to download and display this poster around your organisation and social media.

It would be amazing to see as many people as possible getting involved in the week’s events and, perhaps, even organising their very own events themselves!

You can download a copy of the National Hate Crime Awareness Week Poster here.

Stop Hate UK is proud to be an official partner in National Hate Crime Awareness Week. Look out for #NHCAW on our Twitter and Facebook pages and right across social media.

Stop Hate UK is proud to support National Hate Crime Awareness Week

National Hate Crime Awareness Week

Saturday 8th-Saturday 15th October 2016

Stop Hate UK are once again proud to be working in partnership with the charity, 17-24-30, to coordinate and promote National Hate Crime Awareness Week 2016.

17-24-30 was set up in 2009 by Mark Healey and Ryan Parkins following the London bombings in 1999 so that we would never forget the 139 people who were killed or injured. National Hate Crime Awareness Week has since become a focus each year for individuals and organisations, large and small, to show their commitment to stopping hate.

The week begins on Saturday 8th October with a service of Hope and Remembrance at St. Paul’s Cathedral, to remember all those who have lost their lives because of Hate Crime and all those who have been affected by it. (Click here for the full launch event information)

During the week various events and initiatives will be held throughout the country by charitable and voluntary organisations, statutory agencies such as the police, police and crime commissioners, local authorities – and many others. Through information stalls, campaigns and social media these agencies will be working together to raise awareness about the different ways to report Hate Crime and the support services that exist to help those who are affected. You can see the Guide to holding your own event by clicking here

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK said:

“National Hate Crime Awareness Week is always a wonderful event, as it sees so many organisations working together to raise awareness about Hate Crime. Hate Crime across all monitored strands – disability, faith, gender identity, race and sexual orientation is a much under-reported crime. It’s important that we all continue to work together to ensure that those people who have been impacted by Hate Crime know where and how they can access support and the different options available to them. We want to see all perpetrators brought to justice and our communities made safer.”

Stop Hate UK and 17-24-30 have released a joint press release, which you can read by clicking here.

We hope as many people as possible participate in National Hate Crime Awareness Week. Keby looking for #NHCAW right across social media.

 

Infographic Highlights Post Referendum Racism Report

Further to the report by the social media sites PostRefRacism, Worrying Signs and iStreetWatch, on post referendum racism that we published on our website and social media recently – they’ve now neatly summarised the key findings into an infographic.

You can see the infographic key findings by clicking here or if you missed their full report, you can read it by clicking here.

As we have already stated, Stop Hate UK welcomes the release of this report. Remember, we’ll shortly be issuing our own report, based on our Helpline statistics, pre and post ‘Brexit’, so be sure to check back soon to see it!

By presenting a united stance of zero tolerance towards any kind of Hate Crime, organisations like ourselves and the sites mentioned above, together with your support, can really make a difference in helping all those affected by Hate Crime.

I Will Keep Fighting – Reflections a week on from Orlando

It’s been a week since the LGBT hate crime in Orlando and to be perfectly honest I’m still not sure what to say.

I am a member of the LGBTQ+ community and I was devastated when I woke up last Sunday to hear what had unfolded during the Latinx night at Pulse nightclub. I attended the Vigil for the Orlando victims in Leeds on Monday night. I spoke to friends and family members about what had happened, how they felt, what they thought…

And yet when I told someone I was going to write a post about Orlando, they asked “Why? You’ve got enough on your plate, do you need to? ”

No I suppose I don’t “need” to. After all what good is writing a post about it going to do? Perhaps they are right about that, this post isn’t going to bring back those people, it’s not going to change the world.

It’s been a week, plenty of other terrible events have happened around the world since last weekend. But the impact of this horrific hate crime hasn’t stopped because 7 days have passed. Time passing does not mean this tragedy is not still haunting the thoughts of people around the world. It does not mean that LGBTQ+ people don’t feel scared to go to LGBT venues anymore or be the person they really are.

I can’t help but think so this is what it takes? 49 people have to be murdered for people to think:

“Oh maybe we’re not quite at equal rights yet”

“Maybe allowing same sex marriage hasn’t made everything wonderful for the gay community.”

No it hasn’t and no we aren’t treated equally. This LGBT hate crime was a horrific display of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia but please do not make the mistake of thinking this is a one off hate crime. Please do not think that LGBTQ+ individuals around the world are not subjected to mockery, cruelty and even violence on a daily basis because trust me we are.

From the stares walking down the street holding your partner’s hand

The questioning looks in public when someone says “is that a boy or a girl?”

The person who tells you to go to the “right” bathroom

The family gatherings where you should be happy that you’re allowed to bring your “friend”

The “you’re so gay” comment made when someone does something stupid

The stereotype based bullying of the more masculine girl at school or the more effeminate boy

To be honest I could write on and on about the way the LGBTQ+ community are treated and how frankly tiring it can be. I could talk about the assault and murder figures for Trans People of Colour, especially Trans Women. I could talk about the self-harm and suicide rates amongst LGBTQ+ youth. But even as I write this, there is a small part of me saying “well who is really going to read this, who is really going to care” because after all it seems the vast majority of people only care when 49 individuals are murdered. But I have to believe that this will get better, I have to believe that these every day hate incidents and hate crimes will start being challenged and start getting rarer because if not what is the point of what I do.

I am very well aware that I have not written anything ground breaking here and that some people may read this and think “I’ve read this in every other LGBTQ+ blog.” But if reading these posts makes someone think twice about staring the next time they see a gay couple holding hands in public or whispering to their friend when they question a stranger’s gender, then trust me I am more than happy to be as repetitive as the next LGBTQ+ blog.

And to anyone out there reading this feeling alone and fed up, please know that you are not alone and these every day hate incidents are not something you should just “get used to.” Being targeted because of your sexuality or gender identity is wrong. The hate is wrong, you are not wrong. You are important and your identity is valid. So if you feel safe and comfortable to do so, please report it when you suffer a hate incident or hate crime. There are people out there who care and will do their best to support you.

So what has this horrific hate crime taught me? I guess it’s taught me what I knew but didn’t like to admit to myself, that essentially we have so much further to go and so much more to fight for. I for one am going to keep fighting and I would love it if you did too.

Oliver O’D – Assistant Advocate and Helpline Operator, Stop Hate UK

In response to the LGBT hate crime in Orlando Stop Hate UK have reopened the LGB & T hate crime helpline across England, Scotland and Wales. Report LGBT hate crime 24 hours a day on 0808 801 0661

Launch of West Yorkshire Hate Crime Reporting APP

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of a new Hate Crime Reporting App.

Its aim is to aid witnesses and those targeted because of their identity, throughout West Yorkshire, to report incidents of Hate Crime and be able to access information and advice about Hate Crime services.

Development of the App has been made possible by funding from the Police and Crime Commissioner of West Yorkshire, as part of the Supporting Victims of Hate Crime Fund.

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK said:

“This is an exciting new service giving West Yorkshire residents and visitors greater choice to report Hate Crime. The new App complements our own helplines and other reporting channels and, by capturing images of incidents, can provide the additional evidence needed to successfully investigate incidents. The information in the App about Hate Crime and other partner agencies within West Yorkshire will help people seek help as and when they are ready to do so – be that immediately after an incident or when they feel ready.”

We would like to thank the Office of the West Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner for supporting the development of the App and for demonstrating their commitment to achieving sustainable Hate Crime services.

Rose continued:

“All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported. Some individuals and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council. The App gives victims and witnesses a safe and independent way to tell our charity, Stop Hate UK, about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.”

People can report via the App anonymously if they prefer but where consent is given, we will work with others to find the best possible solution to the issues raised.

Hate Crime Reporting AppThe App can be downloaded free of charge from the Apple App Store and Google Play by searching for ‘Stop Hate UK’ on either platform.

We’re also pleased to say that the advent of the App has recently been highlighted in an article in The Yorkshire Post and its launch seems particularly timely and, moreover, somehow more poignant, given the recent sad and very tragic events in the USA, which saddened and shocked us all so deeply.

The charity, whose Patron is Baroness Doreen Lawrence of Clarendon OBE, of Clarendon in the Commonwealth Realm of Jamaica; and ambassadors are Canon Mark Oakley of St Paul’s Cathedral and Great Britain athlete Adrian Derbyshire set up the Stop Hate Line in 2006 as a direct response to Recommendation 16 of the Macpherson Report (the enquiry into the handling of the death of Stephen Lawrence) which states that victims and witnesses should be able to report Hate Incidents 24 hours a day and to someone other than the police.