Stop Hate UK – Comment on 2019-20 Hate Crime Figures

Stop Hate UK – Comment on 2019-20 Hate Crime Figures

National Hate Crime Awareness Week is always a timely reminder of one of the reasons why the week exists, when the annual Home Office Hate Crime statistics are released.

Sadly, but unsurprisingly, this year’s stats show another rise in the overall number of hate crimes recorded by police in England and Wales – to its highest overall number since records began in 2011/12 – with racially motivated offences rising by more than 4,000 in a year.

Official figures show 105,090 hate crimes were recorded in 2019/20, which is a rise of 8%, compared with 97,446 offences in 2018/19.

According to Home Office data, race Hate Crimes accounted for almost three out of four recorded offences (72%), equating to 76,070 offences, a rise of 6% since 2018/19.

It is of particular note that, this year, a separate report has also been published by the government department, looking specifically at the trends during the Coronavirus pandemic, which warned that rises in racially or religiously aggravated Hate Crime in June were a third higher than the previous year and remained high in July.

The provisional findings has suggested that this is “likely to be related to the Black Lives Matter protests and far-right groups’ counter-protests in England and Wales following the killing of George Floyd, in the United States of America, on 25th May 2020.

The main Hate Crime figures also show that offences motivated by sexual orientation, rose by 19% to 15,835 in 2019/20, from 13,314 a year earlier, whilst Transgender identity hate crime went up 16% in the same period, from 2,183 to 2,540, reaching its highest level since records began in 2011/12 (296).

Disability Hate Crime increased by 9% from 7,786 to 8,469, which is also a record high.

The report puts the rise in Hate Crime over the last five years down to “improvements in crime recording by the police” but also recognised that there had been spikes in reports following events like the EU Referendum in 2016 and the 2017 terror attacks.

In fact, the only decrease in Hate Crime incidents, of any kind, occurred in Religious motivations fell by 5%, from a peak of 7,203 the previous year to 6,822 – the first drop since 2012/13, which is actually a surprise to Stop Hate UK, considering the feedback and dialogue we have with many faith groups and is also somewhat at odds with information gathered for the all-party parliamentary group for British Sikhs, organised by the Sikh Federation (UK) and the Sikh Network.

It focused on the network’s new Sikh Manifesto, which reported that anti-Sikh Hate has not been adequately acknowledged by the government and found that the number of crimes reported has risen by 60 per cent in the last 12 months, despite no government support to increase reporting.

Commenting on the Hate Crime figures as a whole our Chief Executive, Rose Simkins, had the following to say; “The rising figures are likely to be a combination of a rise in crimes and a rise in people coming forward to report them.

What we know from talking to people is that many are still not reporting these crimes and these figures still do not represent a true depiction or the scale of the full picture.

Some people call us and say they don’t want to go to the police or think they will be too busy to deal with it, so there are still a lot of people still suffering in silence. We want all those directly and indirectly affected to feel comfortable in reporting Hate Crimes, even if they believe nothing can or will be done because, if anything, it helps us to understand the extent of the problem.”

Rose also added that BAME and LGBT communities, and people with disabilities, in particular, had a ‘right to know’ how big the problem was, saying;

“The increased debate around trans issues and the recent controversy surrounding some ‘high profile’ people’s views on transgender issues, are most certainly contributing factors to the sharp rise in Transphobia, which is very worrying.

It is no huge surprise that racism accounts for almost 75% of offences as, in recent years, it has dominated police and our own reports. Sadly, many people use public debates – such as the discussion around gender identity and the Black Lives Matter movement – to be hostile and say hurtful things.”

It’s also a real worry to Stop Hate UK, that some families have reported that they were actually too scared to sit in their gardens, play with their children outside or put the bins out after experiencing intimidating behaviour from neighbours – and some people have felt unable to escape abuse in areas still subject to lockdown restrictions, which is potentially set to rise again now it looks like a second wave of the pandemic is upon us.

During the initial lockdown (which is the period covered by the separate report) incidents have included verbal slurs, being coughed at in the street and banging on walls or windows, with fears from some that such incidents may have been prompted by a backlash to the Black Lives Matter protests.

In summary, whilst we always welcome the publishing of these ‘official’ statistics and we agree that a certain amount of the increases can be attributed to ‘improvements in Hate Crime recording by the Police’. However, we also know that these numbers do not represent the full picture of the problem of Hate in the UK and that we still have much to do.

We also agree with the Home Office, when they say that “those who commit “hateful attacks should feel the full force of the law”.

To find out more about the work Stop Hate UK do and how you can make a difference, visit www.stophateuk.org or email info@stophateuk.org

Stop Hate UK Response to the latest Police Hate Crime figures

Stop Hate UK response to latest Hate Crime figures

Yesterday saw the release of the latest Hate Crime figures in England and Wales, issued by the Home Office.

The figures report an overall increase of 17% in overall reports of Hate Crime incidents, to a record high of 94,098, with over 75% classified as a “race hate”.

Sadly, but perhaps not surprisingly given the current political and social climate, there has also been a surge in the number of reports where the motivation of the perpetrator is an individual’s religious beliefs.

The report also shows that over half of all incidents of this kind were directed at Muslims.

Stop Hate UK’s own statistics, for the same period, reflect a similar pattern to those published today by the Home Office, in terms of the overall increase in reports and the motivations behind the incidents.

However, whilst we do agree that their is now a greater ‘willingness to report’ and the figures continue to be affected by ‘Brexit’, there is still much more we all need to do to tackle Hate Crime.

This is especially true as we prepare ourselves for the conclusion of ‘Brexit’ negotiations and the unknown outcomes that will doubtless affect the Hate Crime landscape further.

We must also do more to tackle incidents of online Hate, as the ever-changing patterns in our daily consumption of social media and other online platforms will only increase in the future.

To find out more about the work of Stop Hate UK visit www.stophateuk.org or email info@stophateuk.org

You can view the Home Office Hate Crime Report here.

 

 

National Hate Crime Awareness 2017 – Joint Press Release

October 14th 2017 marks the beginning of the 6th annual National Hate Crime Awareness Week #NHCAW. The week starts with a special launch event at St Paul’s Cathedral, at 6pm on Sunday 15th October, followed by Hate Crime awareness events right across the UK for the duration of the week.

The week is organised by the anti-Hate Crime charity 17-24-30 No Hate Crime Campaign, in partnership with Stop Hate UK, the leading national Hate Crime charity.

This year we are also very pleased to announce that 17-24 -30 has received funding for National Hate Crime Awareness Week from both DCLG (Department for Communities and Local Government) and MOPAC (Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime – London) in order to increase awareness of the week and increase the range of merchandise we can offer to support events and initiatives across the country.

Last year over 200 events were organised and registered on the 17-24-30 website, where you can find a full list of all the Hate Crime events and activities taking place around the UK on its annual National Hate Crime Google map.

The week’s aim is to encourage all of us including local authorities, local councils and local police services to work together with communities affected by Hate Crime across the UK to stage Hate Crime awareness events to promote a message of HOPE.

The acronym HOPE stands for:

  • Hate crime awareness,
  • Operational response to hate crime,
  • Preventing hate crime and
  • Empowering communities to report hate crime and access support services.

Founder of 17-24-30, Mark Healey says

“We are very proud that National Hate Crime Awareness Week is now being marked by so many local authorities and organisations around the UK. This will be our biggest year yet but there is still so much more that needs to be done. We need to get every local authority involved. We want people to organise and get involved in hate crime awareness events everywhere around the UK, to remember those we have lost, and stand together with all those affected by these horrendous attacks. Working together we will eliminate all forms of hate crime.”

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK believes it’s an important week in the calendar by adding

“We wholeheartedly support National Hate Crime Awareness week and we would encourage people to show their support to the many people affected by Hate Crime. Although every week is Hate Crime Awareness week for Stop Hate UK the week gives others the opportunity to show their support for this vital work and for us all to work closer together.”

The week is supported at both organisations’ websites and via social media using #NHCAW. The week runs from Saturday 14th October until Saturday 21st October 2017.

For more information visit our NHCAW page or visit the National Hate Crime Awareness Week website.

National Hate Crime Awareness Week Press Release from Lincolnshire Police

Press release from Chief Inspector Daniel Whyment of Lincolnshire Police:

National Hate Crime Awareness week

Communities in Lincolnshire are urged to come together and stamp out all forms of hate crime, as part of National Hate Crime Awareness Week – a campaign hosted by 17-24-30 in partnership with Stop Hate UK.

The Awareness week first began in 2012, and is in its sixth year of running, with the joint-purpose of:

  • Raising awareness of hate crimes – and
  • Encouraging local authorities to work with partners and communities to tackle hate crimes.

Lincolnshire Police as part of the Safer Communities partnership are supporting that campaign, and throughout the week will be discussing the various different Hate Crimes on our Twitter and Facebook pages.

Chief Inspector Dan Whyment, Chair of Lincolnshire Hate Crime Delivery Group, said:

“It is vital that the public have the confidence to report all forms of Hate Crimes, so that we can bring an end to prejudice and discrimination in communities in Lincolnshire. This campaign is an excellent opportunity to raise awareness of the different types of Hate Crimes, and demonstrate how necessary and vital it is that communities group together to report and stamp out all forms of Hate Crime.

Lincolnshire is an open and tolerant county for everyone, no matter who you are or where you come from. This annual campaign remains an important part of the year to remind the public to treat all forms of Hate Crime as if they were being committed against one of your friends – and report it immediately via 999 in an emergency, or 101.”

Hate crimes can be reported via:

Stop Hate UK

You can also report hate crime in Lincolnshire to Stop Hate UK on: 0800 138 1625

Text: 07717 989 025

Email: talk@stophateuk.org

Web Chat: www.stophateuk.org/talk

Text Relay, for the deaf and hearing / speech impaired callers: 18001 0800 138 1625

 

More help and support in Lincolnshire:

Just Lincolnshire – 01522 520174/07867 385826

www.JustLincolnshire.org.uk

Email: sue@justlincolnshire.co.uk

 

Victim Support

16 Melville Street

Lincoln

LN5 7BW

0300 303 1947

www.victimsupport.org.uk

 

GIRES – Gender Identity Research and Education Society

www.gires.org.uk

Hate Crime incidents soar in wake of Brexit vote

New Home Office figures have just been released and show that the number of hate crimes leapt by 41% in the month after the vote to leave the European Union.

The data, collated from 31 police forces showed that in the two weeks prior to the referendum, including the day of the referendum itself (23rd June), they recorded 1,546 racially or religiously aggravated offences.

Hate Crime Increases After Brexit Vote

In the fortnight immediately after the vote to leave the UE, the number had climbed to 2,241. There was also an increase in racially and religiously aggravated offences recorded in June, followed by an even sharper rise in July 2016.

And, although Levels of hate crime and racist incidents have since declined but remain significantly higher than last year. Overall there were 52,465 incidents of hate crime in the year ending March 2016, an increase of 19% on the previous year.

Stop Hate UK is not surprised by today’s official figures, as it confirms what we ourselves had been seeing and hearing across our reporting platforms. However, we feel that people need to be aware of the true facts and statistics, so that more incidents of Hate Crime are reported to the police or to organisations like Stop Hate UK.

You can read more by looking at the articles from The Independent.” and ‘The Guardian’.

Theresa May’s Message of Support

Prime Minister Theresa May gives her message of support for Hate Crime Awareness Week 2016.

Downing Street

Prime Minister Theresa May said the following today in support of National Hate Crime Awareness Week:

“I am pleased to support the Hate Crime Awareness Week.

Hate crime has no place in Britain. In my 6 years as Home Secretary I saw the pain and suffering it causes – and the consequences when we fail to act. As Prime Minister, I am determined to make Britain a place where all our communities can flourish and all people – whatever their background, can go as far as their talents will take them. That means stamping out sickening and shameful hate crime.

Everybody living in this country is equal and everybody is free to lead their lives as they see fit. We are free to practise any faith, follow any religious denomination, or ignore religion altogether.

We have one of the strongest legislative frameworks in the world continuing to protect communities from hostility, violence, homophobia and bigotry but we need to do more.

It is completely unacceptable for people to suffer abuse or attacks because of their nationality, ethnic background or colour of their skin. This government will not stand for it.

We have already taken steps to improve our collective response to hate crime. Police forces now ensure that the recording of religion-based hate crime now includes the faith of the victim. The Crown Prosecution Service has issued new guidance to prosecutors on racially aggravated crime, and we have provided funding for protective security at vulnerable institutions and for community organisations to help tackle hate crime.

We have published the Hate crime action plan which includes working with schools to equip teachers and parents to challenge hatred and know how to report it. And we are working directly with communities to challenge the harms that they see every day as a result of hate crime, including a £2.4 million fund for security for places of worship, and new funding for projects that tackle hate crime in communities.

But we must go further. As long as hate crime exists, we must challenge ourselves to do more. Because, as I said on the steps of Downing Street, my mission is to make Britain a country that works for everyone. Hate crime of any kind, directed against any community, race or religion, has absolutely no place in British society.

Together, by standing against hate and for tolerance, we can build a better and more united Britain that works for everyone.”