Brian Stop Hate UK Trustee

Why I became a Stop Hate UK Trustee, by Brian Culleton

Stop Hate UK has seen quite a few new faces join the team recently; from volunteers to helpline operators to employees and trustees – which is great news for the strength of the charity and its collective skills.

 Just last week, one of the training sessions featured our new trustee, Brian Culleton, who joined the charity in the middle of 2016 and Brian has kindly put together a very emotive piece as to the reasons why he became involved with Stop Hate UK.

We’re only too happy to share this with you, as an insight into one of our newer trustees viewpoint and the motivations behind the decision to become a trustee of Stop Hate UK.

Over to Brian….Brian Stop Hate UK Trustee


“Hello. I’m Brian Culleton and I’m on the Board of Trustees for Stop Hate UK.   I joined the board in June 2016 after meeting with Rose Simkins (Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK) and having a conference call with the Chair of Trustees (Graham Lewis) and another trustee.

My main reason for joining Stop Hate UK was due to the ongoing treatment of transgender people, which prompted me to research some charities to which I could support.  As it turned out, the more I read around the subject, I quickly realised that I was more interested in stopping all forms of hate, bias and discrimination towards all people.  

After meeting with Rose and speaking with Graham, I was even more enthused and became very keen to join the board, to help ensure that the work of this wonderful charity continues for many more years.

I acknowledge that the very mission statement or aim, I suppose, of every charity, group or support network is actually not to exist.  For example; if there were no Hate Crime in the UK, Stop Hate UK’s work would be done…!  Isn’t that the ultimate goal of every charity?

Unfortunately, just as we think that we’re making strides in this country, people’s mindsets don’t move in line with legislation. For example, just because equal marriage was introduced, doesn’t mean that homophobia was eradicated.

Similarly, the outcome of the Brexit vote resulted in an upsurge in Hate Crime that was unprecedented.  Some people thought it presented them with legitimate excuse to attack (verbally and physically) any non-national.  

All colleagues and volunteers involved in Stop Hate UK have become part of this wonderful charity because they feel impassioned about preventing Hate Crime and supporting those affected by it.  The work of this charity is of paramount importance and will continue to be needed until society accepts the incredible diversity that we have in this country.

As for my role, and the role of the wider Board of Trustees, we simply have a responsibility for the management of the charity.  We have to ensure that the charity’s assets and resources are used only for the purposes of Stop Hate UK.  This involves safeguarding all of the charity’s assets such as cash, intellectual property (i.e. marketing material), staff and reputation.  We are also responsible for establishing and monitoring all associated policies and employment procedures.  This includes the recruitment policy, grievance policy, levels of authority policy, disciplinary policy … the list goes on.  Essentially, we, as the Board, are tasked with ensuring that the Stop Hate UK is run in accordance with its constitution, charity law and all governing documents.  We need to make sure that the board performance is effective and we support/manage Rose as the Chief Executive.

The Board of Trustees is made up of two elements; the overall Board and also the Finance, Governance and HR sub-group.  My role is the Finance Lead and it is my responsibility to make sure that Stop Hate UK keeps proper accounts and to review the financial performance.

It is also my responsibility, along with the Board, to ensure that Stop Hate UK has robust and effective financial controls in place.

I acknowledge that it all sounds very convoluted but we, as a Board, are effectively there to ensure that the charity remains as a going concern (i.e. the charity remains operating for the foreseeable future).  All the Stop Hate UK Trustees bring different professional skills, resources, connections and life experiences to ensure that we continue to be as effective a board as possible.

We’re not ethereal beings – we’re very ordinary people who are involved in Stop Hate UK simply for the same reasons that you are – we want to make Hate Crime a thing of the past – and step-by-step we’re supporting and educating people to allow them to see the true beauty and diversity of this incredible country.

From my perspective, I would like to thank all Stop Hate UK employees and volunteers for the work that you do.  Without your input and support to make Stop Hate UK so fantastic, our role as Board of Trustees would be redundant and cease to exist.  All of you do the hard work and we are well aware of that so a massive, heartfelt and sincere thank you to all of you.”

We’d like to thank Brian for taking the time out to write such an emotive, insightful piece and we look forward to his continued support as a Trustee of Stop Hate UK.

Stop Hate UK to launch in Essex

Press Release – Stop Hate UK Helpline to launch in Essex

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the recent launch of the 24-hour Stop Hate Line helpline service across Essex. The service has been funded by The Police and Crime Commissioner for Essex.

Commenting on the launch of service, Essex Police & Crime Commissioner, Roger Hirst, said:

“Essex is a safe place to live with resilient communities and strong relationships between communities, the voluntary sector and public services.

‘We need to make sure that we encourage the reporting of hate crime so that we can deal with it together. This is a confidential service designed to help encourage people to come forward and report hate crime but also access the support services they need.”

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK, added:

All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported and some individuals and even whole communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council.

The Stop Hate Line, plus our other range of reporting channels, gives victims and witnesses of Hate Crime a safe and independent place to talk about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.

Rose continued:

We are able to support people who feel they have nowhere else to turn. Contact with our helpline, or other reporting channels, might be the first time an individual has talked to someone about the things they are experiencing. Other people may have tried to get help but find they are not satisfied with the response they received. No one should have to suffer Hate Crime in silence. Sadly the occurrence of Hate Crime has increased nationally but, working together with The Police and Crime Commissioner, this is a trend we can reverse.”

People can contact the Stop Hate Line anonymously if they prefer. Where someone has chosen to give their personal details to Stop Hate UK, their trained staff and volunteers will ask who they want their details to be shared with. The charity can also share information with the police and council, with consent, to ensure that those affected by Hate Crime, in any way, can access the support they need.

The Stop Hate Line is open 24 hours a day, every day of the year on 0800 138 1625. The helpline is also available by text message on 07717 989 025 and by email to talk@stophateuk.org. Service users with Hearing Impairments can report via interactive BSL by clicking the link on our website www.stophateuk.org. Victims and witnesses can also chat on the web or fill in an online form by visiting www.stophateuk.org/talk.

Stop Hate UK is a national charity that provides independent and confidential support to people who are affected by all forms of Hate Crime. The Stop Hate Line is Stop Hate UK’s Hate Crime reporting and support helpline. Anyone in Essex can contact the Stop Hate Line to talk about how they have been directly or indirectly affected by Hate Crime.

The charity, whose Patron is Baroness Doreen Lawrence of Clarendon OBE, of Clarendon in the Commonwealth Realm of Jamaica, and ambassadors are Canon Mark Oakley of St Paul’s Cathedral and Great Britain athlete Adrian Derbyshire set up the Stop Hate Line in 2006 in direct response to Recommendation 16 of the Macpherson Report (the enquiry into the handling of the death of Stephen Lawrence) states that victims and witnesses should be able to report Hate Incidents 24 hours a day and to someone other than the police.

To download a copy of this press release click here: Press Release – Essex Stop Hate UK Helpline Service_Final

If you would like to talk to Stop Hate UK about this or any other aspect of our services please email info@stophateuk.org.

Stop Hate UK Response – Release of Police Hate Crime Figures – Post Brexit Vote, July to September 2016

Statement from Stop Hate UK on Hate Crime figures post Brexit vote

As you may have seen featuring heavily in the news, the majority of police forces in England and Wales have reported record levels of Hate Crimes reported to them, in the 3 months directly after the EU referendum, with more than 14,000 Hate Crimes being reported and 10 forces reported more than a 50% increase on the previous 3 months.

Whilst the figures are alarming and saddening, in equal measures, Stop Hate UK is not entirely surprised by them.

During the same period, as part of our day-to-day work to support those affected by Hate Crime, we saw first hand what was happening all across the UK, between July and September. In the 3 weeks directly after the referendum result, our own statistics saw a 60% increase in incidents reported to us, via our reporting channels.

Across the quarter, which covers the same 3 months as the police figures, Stop Hate UK recorded an increase of 32% in reported incidents overall and, whilst motivations of disability and gender identity were comparatively static, incidents motivated by race saw a 55% increase and those motivated by religion an 80% increase.

Stop Hate UK welcomes the release of these figures into the public domain, as it does now put into direct context the impact of the ‘Brexit’ campaign and it’s undeniable effect upon incidences of Hate Crime in the UK, which was doubted and even dismissed by certain sections of the media and across the political spectrum.

To find out more about Stop Hate UK and our work, visit www.stophateuk.org or email info@stophateuk.org

Stop Hate UK T-shirts available now!

Stop Hate UK T-Shirts - Now in stockDue to popular demand, Stop Hate UK T-shirts are back!

That’s right, our fab new white cotton t-shirts have just arrived, featuring our colour logo and ‘Stop Hate. Start Here.’ branding, together with the hashtag ‘#NoPlaceForHate’, they’re a great way to show your support for our work and spread the word!

Available (initially) in sizes Large and XL, for £10.95 including postage and packing, they make a great gift for a loved one, friend or relative, just in time for Christmas, or just as a treat for yourself.

You’ll soon be able to buy them directly from our website, along with some other great Stop Hate merchandise, but you can pre-order yours now by emailing info@stophateuk.org with your details and order.

Thanks in advance for your support!

 

Joint Statement: Stop Hate UK & Suzy Lamplugh Trust

Stop Hate UK and the Suzy Lamplugh Trust have issued a joint statement on safety in today’s society and why proper training could help to tackle Hate Crime.

JOINT STATEMENT

In a recent article, published by The Guardian online, the Scottish Government’s Independent Advisory Group on hate crime, prejudice and community cohesion suggested that responsibility for tackling hate crime in society should extend beyond the criminal justice system and that certain groups, such as teachers and bus drivers, need training to tackle “blatant and latent” prejudice and indifference before it escalates into Hate Crime.

In response to this, here is our joint statement;

“Everyone has the right to feel safe. This right applies whoever you are, wherever you are and whatever you are doing.

Regrettably, there are individuals who threaten our right to feel safe, by committing acts of Hate Crime and, sadly, crimes of this nature are among the most underreported incidents in the UK.

Stop Hate UK and Suzy Lamplugh Trust have worked together for a number of years to help those who have experienced Hate Crime, or are fearful of experiencing Hate Crime to feel safer and more confident.

In response to the worrying increase in Hate Crimes that have been reported since the UK voted to leave the European Union, we are releasing a statement to provide guidance on what you can do if you experience or witness Hate Crime or other targeted crime involving any aspect of an individual’s identity.

Safety First

If you experience or witness an act of Hate Crime, consider the personal safety of the victim(s), the person targeted and those around them and your own. Verbal aggression, including that motivated by hate, can rapidly escalate into physical violence so the safest thing may be to remove yourself from the situation or to help others to do so, as quickly as possible.

How and when to intervene

While we call for a society in which we could all challenge hostile or abusive behaviour safely, we remain acutely aware that there are potential risks to individuals who attempt to intervene in aggressive situations. Although intended to support the victim or person targeted, intervention can sometimes result in an escalation of behaviour and put others at risk of harm.

Before attempting to intervene, try to assess the risk. Could you defuse the situation, for example by talking calmly the aggressor and asking them to stop? Or can you show concern for the victim or person targeted by asking them if they are OK? Bear in mind that someone who is being singled out may not necessarily feel empowered if they feel others are ‘taking over’. If intervening yourself would put you or others at risk, either seek help from other people in the vicinity of an incident or call 999.

Report it

Hate Crimes are often not reported. You can report incidents of Hate Crime to the police, online through True Vision or via independent services such as Stop Hate UK.

It can also be helpful to the police to have recorded evidence of Hate Crime incidents.

Stop Hate UK recently launched its own Hate Crime Reporting App, to serve the West Yorkshire region. This it has been developed specifically for capturing and reporting hate incidents. However, before attempting to record someone who is behaving aggressively, consider whether there is a risk that this could escalate the situation.

As a direct response to calls for training on what to do if you witness Hate Crime is now available, Stop Hate UK are pleased to say that we now have specially developed training available, to help people be better equipped to understand how to deal with incidences of Hate Crime and to provide key insights into educating people how to report and respond to violent incidents.

We feel this is of particular relevance to people who are taking immediate responsibility in a situation, such as a teacher, nurse or a bus driver, who need the training, skills to be able to deal with a potentially difficult situation, without also putting themselves at risk. You can find out more about this by clicking here or by going to www.stophateuk.org or www.suzylamplugh.org

Being violent or aggressive towards another person because of who they are is intolerable. Stop Hate UK and Suzy Lamplugh Trust are committed to continuing to work together to reduce the risk of violence and aggression and to challenge all forms of Hate Crime and discrimination.

Stop Hate UK works alongside local strategic partnerships to tackle Hate Crime and discrimination, encourage reporting and the supporting of the individuals and communities it affects.”

If you have any questions or want more information on how Stop Hate UK can help with training, support or anything else relating to Hate Crime click here to find out how to contact us

The Award Winning West Yorkshire Hate Crime Reporting App

We were all over the moon recently, when we found out that our West Yorkshire Hate Crime Reporting App had won an award at The Helplines Partnership Awards!

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As part of The Annual Helpline Event, we were shortlisted in the Best Use of Innovative Technology category and walked away with the category’s top prize, with our recently launched Hate Crime Reporting App for West Yorkshire.

So a big thanks to the to all those that have downloaded and used the app, the Techno Snowball team that developed the technology and, last but not least, the lovely judging panel!

We see the App as a great new, confidential tool to help all those either directly or indirectly affected report Hate Crime, so we’re really proud to receive recognition from such a well-respected industry body.

You can download the App by visiting Google Play or Apple App Store and search for ‘Stop Hate UK’.

Well done everyone! 🙂

My Month at Stop Hate UK, Brexit, Pride and Rejection.

I started my month’s placement with some expectation of the charity world, with experience from Oxfam and local community centres, I thought I knew what to expect. But Stop Hate UK seems a unique charity, small in size but big in support. 

What struck me most was the resilience of the staff, day in day out – through their 24-hour helpline they are faced with hard hitting, often heartbreaking stories from those in need of a friendly ear and informed advice. 

After Brexit, it was more difficult for me to stay optimistic about universalism and societal acceptance, but Stop Hate UK was continuing to lead the way to an open dialogue between the people experiencing discrimination directly, and the Police. The importance of reporting Hate Crime became very obvious, very quickly. By reporting, and recording Hate Crime, it is the only way that the Police services and other protectionary bodies can be aware of what is going on a grass roots level which shapes action and prevention.

Despite the sense of national tension and uncertainty at the time, the office was overwhelmed by the kindness and generosity from individuals and organisations standing up against racism and discrimination of all kinds. With the sale of T-Shirts, proclaiming: ‘You are welcome here!’ with proceeds, sponsored walk, sky-dives, people had united to say ‘Yes’ to Brexit but ‘NO!’ to racism. 

Throughout my placement I worked on various aspects, which I appreciate Stop Hate UK trusting me with, from creating a Fundraising Pack to applying for a grant for Leeds Pride 2016. I proposed a project for Leeds Pride, with an artistic twist aimed at increasing the Stop Hate UK’s publicity through a Facebook campaign. 

However, the effectiveness of the Social Media platform is nothing new to Stop Hate UK, as avid networkers and tweeters, with hashtags flying everywhere, I felt like a novice in the field in comparison. I even witnessed the preparations of a collaboration with Twitter, (YES TWITTER!) for an anti-hate speech online campaign. This was cutting edge stuff!

Unfortunately, my Leeds Pride Grant application was unsuccessful. Even though I had true belief and passion for the proposed project, sometimes, or even often, you will not get the funding you want and believe you should. That is the real world. Much like Brexit, big decisions can be out of your hands.

However, in terms of Hate Crime, if you are being abused and discriminated against, you should know that Stop Hate UK is here to back you up and will endeavour to ensure you feel safe and in control. 

I would like to thank Stop Hate UK, an organisation made up of amazing individuals for teaching so much and really inspiring me for the future! 

Joselene

Hate Crime incidents soar in wake of Brexit vote

New Home Office figures have just been released and show that the number of hate crimes leapt by 41% in the month after the vote to leave the European Union.

The data, collated from 31 police forces showed that in the two weeks prior to the referendum, including the day of the referendum itself (23rd June), they recorded 1,546 racially or religiously aggravated offences.

Hate Crime Increases After Brexit Vote

In the fortnight immediately after the vote to leave the UE, the number had climbed to 2,241. There was also an increase in racially and religiously aggravated offences recorded in June, followed by an even sharper rise in July 2016.

And, although Levels of hate crime and racist incidents have since declined but remain significantly higher than last year. Overall there were 52,465 incidents of hate crime in the year ending March 2016, an increase of 19% on the previous year.

Stop Hate UK is not surprised by today’s official figures, as it confirms what we ourselves had been seeing and hearing across our reporting platforms. However, we feel that people need to be aware of the true facts and statistics, so that more incidents of Hate Crime are reported to the police or to organisations like Stop Hate UK.

You can read more by looking at the articles from The Independent.” and ‘The Guardian’.

Theresa May’s Message of Support

Prime Minister Theresa May gives her message of support for Hate Crime Awareness Week 2016.

Downing Street

Prime Minister Theresa May said the following today in support of National Hate Crime Awareness Week:

“I am pleased to support the Hate Crime Awareness Week.

Hate crime has no place in Britain. In my 6 years as Home Secretary I saw the pain and suffering it causes – and the consequences when we fail to act. As Prime Minister, I am determined to make Britain a place where all our communities can flourish and all people – whatever their background, can go as far as their talents will take them. That means stamping out sickening and shameful hate crime.

Everybody living in this country is equal and everybody is free to lead their lives as they see fit. We are free to practise any faith, follow any religious denomination, or ignore religion altogether.

We have one of the strongest legislative frameworks in the world continuing to protect communities from hostility, violence, homophobia and bigotry but we need to do more.

It is completely unacceptable for people to suffer abuse or attacks because of their nationality, ethnic background or colour of their skin. This government will not stand for it.

We have already taken steps to improve our collective response to hate crime. Police forces now ensure that the recording of religion-based hate crime now includes the faith of the victim. The Crown Prosecution Service has issued new guidance to prosecutors on racially aggravated crime, and we have provided funding for protective security at vulnerable institutions and for community organisations to help tackle hate crime.

We have published the Hate crime action plan which includes working with schools to equip teachers and parents to challenge hatred and know how to report it. And we are working directly with communities to challenge the harms that they see every day as a result of hate crime, including a £2.4 million fund for security for places of worship, and new funding for projects that tackle hate crime in communities.

But we must go further. As long as hate crime exists, we must challenge ourselves to do more. Because, as I said on the steps of Downing Street, my mission is to make Britain a country that works for everyone. Hate crime of any kind, directed against any community, race or religion, has absolutely no place in British society.

Together, by standing against hate and for tolerance, we can build a better and more united Britain that works for everyone.”