Politicians: Polarising Language could lead to Legitimised Hate

We thought we’d share this BBC article that has urged politicians to avoid using polarising language, when campaigning on political issues, as it could lead to “legitimised hate”.

Stop Hate UK are in agreement with the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s concerns that the language used, particularly in the run up to the EU Referendum vote, definitely fuelled the divisive tensions in our society.

The article (and commission) cited the terrible events that led to the killing of both Arkadiusz Jozwick and those leading to the death of MP Jo Cox, as examples of such tensions reaching a tragic peak.

The commission, which is an independent statutory body actually picks out the ‘Brexit’ vote as the defining moment, saying that while the economic implications of the vote were of great importance to the people and the country as a whole, it also noted that there should be “discussion on what values we hold as a country” and criticises the government’s aborted plan for companies to set out the proportion of foreign people they intend to employ.

Like Stop Hate UK, the commission welcomed the government’s Action on Hate Crime.

It’s been 5 months now since ‘Brexit’ and much has been said; and there’s doubtless much still to be said, but if the people who are tasked with, or involved in the running of the country are seen to be using ‘inflammatory’ language in campaigning, debate or in rhetoric, then what message does it send to the public?

There is no coincidence between the use of much more direct language, like those seen during the EU Referendum (from both sides) and the apparent legitimisation of what is effectively ‘Hate Speech’.

Stop Hate UK welcomes the intimation in this article and hopes that politicians and the like, take heed of its concerns.

Posted in Uncategorized.