Infographic Highlights Post Referendum Racism Report

Further to the report by the social media sites PostRefRacism, Worrying Signs and iStreetWatch, on post referendum racism that we published on our website and social media recently – they’ve now neatly summarised the key findings into an infographic.

You can see the infographic key findings by clicking here or if you missed their full report, you can read it by clicking here.

As we have already stated, Stop Hate UK welcomes the release of this report. Remember, we’ll shortly be issuing our own report, based on our Helpline statistics, pre and post ‘Brexit’, so be sure to check back soon to see it!

By presenting a united stance of zero tolerance towards any kind of Hate Crime, organisations like ourselves and the sites mentioned above, together with your support, can really make a difference in helping all those affected by Hate Crime.

I Will Keep Fighting – Reflections a week on from Orlando

It’s been a week since the LGBT hate crime in Orlando and to be perfectly honest I’m still not sure what to say.

I am a member of the LGBTQ+ community and I was devastated when I woke up last Sunday to hear what had unfolded during the Latinx night at Pulse nightclub. I attended the Vigil for the Orlando victims in Leeds on Monday night. I spoke to friends and family members about what had happened, how they felt, what they thought…

And yet when I told someone I was going to write a post about Orlando, they asked “Why? You’ve got enough on your plate, do you need to? ”

No I suppose I don’t “need” to. After all what good is writing a post about it going to do? Perhaps they are right about that, this post isn’t going to bring back those people, it’s not going to change the world.

It’s been a week, plenty of other terrible events have happened around the world since last weekend. But the impact of this horrific hate crime hasn’t stopped because 7 days have passed. Time passing does not mean this tragedy is not still haunting the thoughts of people around the world. It does not mean that LGBTQ+ people don’t feel scared to go to LGBT venues anymore or be the person they really are.

I can’t help but think so this is what it takes? 49 people have to be murdered for people to think:

“Oh maybe we’re not quite at equal rights yet”

“Maybe allowing same sex marriage hasn’t made everything wonderful for the gay community.”

No it hasn’t and no we aren’t treated equally. This LGBT hate crime was a horrific display of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia but please do not make the mistake of thinking this is a one off hate crime. Please do not think that LGBTQ+ individuals around the world are not subjected to mockery, cruelty and even violence on a daily basis because trust me we are.

From the stares walking down the street holding your partner’s hand

The questioning looks in public when someone says “is that a boy or a girl?”

The person who tells you to go to the “right” bathroom

The family gatherings where you should be happy that you’re allowed to bring your “friend”

The “you’re so gay” comment made when someone does something stupid

The stereotype based bullying of the more masculine girl at school or the more effeminate boy

To be honest I could write on and on about the way the LGBTQ+ community are treated and how frankly tiring it can be. I could talk about the assault and murder figures for Trans People of Colour, especially Trans Women. I could talk about the self-harm and suicide rates amongst LGBTQ+ youth. But even as I write this, there is a small part of me saying “well who is really going to read this, who is really going to care” because after all it seems the vast majority of people only care when 49 individuals are murdered. But I have to believe that this will get better, I have to believe that these every day hate incidents and hate crimes will start being challenged and start getting rarer because if not what is the point of what I do.

I am very well aware that I have not written anything ground breaking here and that some people may read this and think “I’ve read this in every other LGBTQ+ blog.” But if reading these posts makes someone think twice about staring the next time they see a gay couple holding hands in public or whispering to their friend when they question a stranger’s gender, then trust me I am more than happy to be as repetitive as the next LGBTQ+ blog.

And to anyone out there reading this feeling alone and fed up, please know that you are not alone and these every day hate incidents are not something you should just “get used to.” Being targeted because of your sexuality or gender identity is wrong. The hate is wrong, you are not wrong. You are important and your identity is valid. So if you feel safe and comfortable to do so, please report it when you suffer a hate incident or hate crime. There are people out there who care and will do their best to support you.

So what has this horrific hate crime taught me? I guess it’s taught me what I knew but didn’t like to admit to myself, that essentially we have so much further to go and so much more to fight for. I for one am going to keep fighting and I would love it if you did too.

Oliver O’D – Assistant Advocate and Helpline Operator, Stop Hate UK

In response to the LGBT hate crime in Orlando Stop Hate UK have reopened the LGB & T hate crime helpline across England, Scotland and Wales. Report LGBT hate crime 24 hours a day on 0808 801 0661

Launch of West Yorkshire Hate Crime Reporting APP

Stop Hate UK is pleased to announce the launch of a new Hate Crime Reporting App.

Its aim is to aid witnesses and those targeted because of their identity, throughout West Yorkshire, to report incidents of Hate Crime and be able to access information and advice about Hate Crime services.

Development of the App has been made possible by funding from the Police and Crime Commissioner of West Yorkshire, as part of the Supporting Victims of Hate Crime Fund.

Rose Simkins, Chief Executive of Stop Hate UK said:

“This is an exciting new service giving West Yorkshire residents and visitors greater choice to report Hate Crime. The new App complements our own helplines and other reporting channels and, by capturing images of incidents, can provide the additional evidence needed to successfully investigate incidents. The information in the App about Hate Crime and other partner agencies within West Yorkshire will help people seek help as and when they are ready to do so – be that immediately after an incident or when they feel ready.”

We would like to thank the Office of the West Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner for supporting the development of the App and for demonstrating their commitment to achieving sustainable Hate Crime services.

Rose continued:

“All forms of Hate Crime are significantly under-reported. Some individuals and communities are reluctant or unwilling to talk to the police or their council. The App gives victims and witnesses a safe and independent way to tell our charity, Stop Hate UK, about their experiences and to explore their options for taking things further.”

People can report via the App anonymously if they prefer but where consent is given, we will work with others to find the best possible solution to the issues raised.

Hate Crime Reporting AppThe App can be downloaded free of charge from the Apple App Store and Google Play by searching for ‘Stop Hate UK’ on either platform.

We’re also pleased to say that the advent of the App has recently been highlighted in an article in The Yorkshire Post and its launch seems particularly timely and, moreover, somehow more poignant, given the recent sad and very tragic events in the USA, which saddened and shocked us all so deeply.

The charity, whose Patron is Baroness Doreen Lawrence of Clarendon OBE, of Clarendon in the Commonwealth Realm of Jamaica; and ambassadors are Canon Mark Oakley of St Paul’s Cathedral and Great Britain athlete Adrian Derbyshire set up the Stop Hate Line in 2006 as a direct response to Recommendation 16 of the Macpherson Report (the enquiry into the handling of the death of Stephen Lawrence) which states that victims and witnesses should be able to report Hate Incidents 24 hours a day and to someone other than the police.

A Vision to ‘Stop Hate’ – Stop Hate UK Strategic Plan

We are very pleased to announce that Stop Hate UK is now in a position to publish its Strategic Plan for the period April 2016 to March 2019.

We have covered a lot of groundwork and planning in setting out our strategy, as we seek to continue our work with people who are affected by Hate Crime or other targeted crime.

Developing a 3-year strategy is a hard task, as we have had to look at all aspects of our work and the charity itself as a whole, from both an introspective and external viewpoint.

I am pleased to say that it was a thoroughly inclusive process, with every area of the organisation represented at an initial away day – from staff to volunteers and members and Trustees– so that we could listen to and gather the thoughts and opinions from people across the charity.

However, turning the spotlight on oneself is incredibly challenging; not only do you look inside to find the good things, but also the things we know we can do better.

Externally, the landscape is ever-changing as, invariably, modern life now moves at such a fast pace and technology evolves, finding more and more ways of invading our lives – sometimes in a great way, but other times in a much more sinister and intrusive way.

So, our first task was to set out what we are here to do…

  • To provide emotional support, advice and information on staying safe in the home or community.
  • To provide support on navigating the very complex criminal justice system and
  • To hold statutory and other bodies to account.

Stop Hate UK also has a long history of providing support to those affected by Hate Crime, often with complex needs, so we wanted to build on the very successful face-to-face advocacy and enhanced support work developed thus far.

Obviously, key to our services and a big part of our strategy as a whole, is to continue to provide our 24-hr helplines – often a ‘lifeline’ for those experiencing the harrowing effects of Hate Crime or other targeted crime.

Our helplines also provides a vehicle to report incidences of Hate Crime, so we are very pleased also to announce that the helplines will continue in their current format, featuring 3 distinctly branded lines. Opportunities to extend the scope of these lines and introduce new ones will be taken wherever this will help our aim to support more and more people experiencing targeted crime.

We also plan to continue to develop our role as a training and consultancy service to a variety of related organisations. Stop Hate UK has recently provided training to the police, prison services, youth offending team, probation services, housing bodies and multi-agency groups. Our new strategy aims to build on this platform whilst looking to increase the range of organisations to which we provide training and also the types of courses and subject areas we cover.

As ever, scrutiny will also be a part of our strategy as, with our extensive expertise, we now have experience in both setting up and managing scrutiny panels, which also includes the recruitment and training of panel members.

Stop Hate UK’s vision is clear and concise: “We dream of a society which is free from hate, harassment and discrimination, where all people are valued for their unique identity.”

But, to realise this dream, we need to be the organisation that provides the vehicle and channels for all those affected to be able to challenge, report and change their experience; we want to be there to support and empower people affected by all forms of Hate Crime; we want to be able to influence and guide organisations in their responses and we need to develop, build and maintain effective partnerships with other organisations to share in our dream.

We must also ensure that our core values do not change during the course of us working towards our vision. All staff, Trustees, members and volunteers must be committed to challenging hatred harassment and discrimination.

So, as part of the wider strategy, we have developed a list of core values that we must all fully embrace to have any chance of achieving our objectives.

For example, we must display genuine sensitivity to how people describe themselves, in order to communicate effectively with them. The language we use in how we communicate with the various people and groups that use our services is a crucial part of the services we provide. Essentially, what we say is of equal importance as how we say it.

To help us to achieve our strategic aims, then, we’ve also developed key objectives, that sit underneath each aim and we believe that if Stop Hate UK’s staff, Trustees, members and volunteers embrace and adopt the strategy and its objectives, our 3-year plan should carry the organisation forward to a better place and a stronger position, come 2019 and, hopefully, we can look back on this time and say that we had a real effect on and brought about change to the Hate Crime landscape.

To see our strategy document in full click here: Stop Hate UK Strategic Plan.

I sincerely hope that this information has given you a valuable insight, as to where, why and how our new strategy was developed and is to be deployed. I would also be more than happy to discuss any aspect of any part of it, if anyone feels they might have any questions or comments.

With that in mind, I thank you for taking the time to read this blog and we all now look forward to Stop Hate UK’s continued success in the fight against Hate Crime.

Rose Simkins
Chief Executive Stop Hate UK

Galop to run vital LGBT domestic violence service

Stop Hate UK would like to express how saddened we were to discover that Broken Rainbow, the UK’s only national LGBT domestic violence charity for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender had gone into liquidation.

Regrettably, this serves only to show just how vulnerable services like this are and why we must all do more to support the vital work that is being done by many voluntary sector organisations.

However, since the news of Broken Rainbow’s demise, we are also very pleased to see that the service will continue but be run by Galop, the leading LGBT anti-violence and abuse charity.

Galop has been working for 33 years to support LGBT victims of abuse, violence and discrimination through a variety of services, including a helpline and as the lead partner of The Domestic Abuse Partnership, which is the only specialist multi-agency community response to LGBT Domestic abuse.

Galop has worked quickly with Broken Rainbow and the Home Office, which provides the funds, to ensure that there is no gap in service.

Nik Noone, Galop’s Chief Executive said,

“This is a vital service and it is important that those experiencing domestic violence in our communities have somewhere to turn when they need support. Galop has worked with all parties to make sure that support continues and there is no disruption to the delivery of this key service.”

Bob Green, Stonewall Housing’s, Chief Executive said,

“I am delighted that Broken Rainbow’s services will continue within Galop. I look forward to these services growing in the future under Galop’s direction.”

So, whilst Stop Hate UK would also like to echo those sentiments, we think it’s also very important to highlight the vulnerability that exists within key services like Broken Rainbow.

Thankfully, a swift solution was possible this time and, in line with the comments above, we also hope this service now goes from strength to strength under Galop.

20 years of challenging hate #10: Why I am who I am by Charlie Lee

At twenty-three I had never volunteered for anything before, never mind been on a training day! So the whole process was not only new but also ever so slightly terrifying. I hadn’t come through the usual channels that people go through in life to get here. Before a few months ago I had never heard of Stop Hate UK. That’s not to say that I wasn’t in need of it or that the publicity team aren’t doing a good job! It has more to do with the fact that I had no idea what Hate Crime was, I had no idea it was even a thing that happened. I thought it was just… the way of the world…

The rising name of Stop Hate UK has not yet spread to Lancashire, never mind the tiny village of Heysham that I called my home until very recently. Which is something that saddens me greatly but also fuels my desire to be involved more than ever. I can’t speak for anyone else but I know I could have used them back when I was in Secondary School. I went to an all girls’ grammar school for seven years – just that simple fact meant we were subject to numerous lesbian rumours and assumptions being made about us. In their defence they were kind of right, about me anyway (I identify as a Queer non-binary person now). But just because they were right it made it a hundred times harder to come out. That and the awful ingrained heteronormativity of our society and stigma of being gay (I didn’t really learn the term ‘queer’ until recently) made the first eighteen years of my life a never-ending nightmare of self-loathing, fear and lies – to myself and everyone around me.

Please don’t get me wrong, I have the most supportive family and an incredible group of friends that anyone could ever ask for! They made the very hard process of – trying to get to know, understand and accept myself – possible to begin with. I know for sure I wouldn’t have come as far as I have without them; especially the two ‘fellow gays’ I met on my first day of University. Tash and Abi gave me the push I needed and provided me with all the queer films, TV shows and literature that I could ever need. They were the first to ever really show me it was okay to be gay and to love who you love.

But being thirteen and sat in Sex Ed, surrounded by twenty-seven people you have come to think of as friends and hearing some of them talk about not wanting to be in the same P.E. changing room with a lesbian in case they ‘look at you’…. Or being seventeen and getting called into the Head of Sixth Form’s office at break because you were ‘caught’ writing lesbian fanfiction in your free periods and she thought it wasn’t ‘appropriate’ and ‘what if one of the younger girls saw it and thought it was okay to be gay?’

Alright, she didn’t say that last bit but it was very heavily implied. And just so we’re clear, other than the fact that the characters were two girls in love with each other, there wasn’t anything remotely ‘inappropriate’ in the story.

Or being put on report for skipping class because you spent that hour hiding in the basement toilets sobbing, overcome with self-loathing and shame for everything you are because the aforementioned teacher – someone who is meant to support and guide you – managed to destroy in fifteen minutes what you had spent your whole life building up and fighting for.

Our family spends most of our lives telling us we can be anything, do anything if we just work hard, believe and set our minds to it. But it wasn’t until after I confessed to my mum that I might be something other than straight, did I start to hear the words ‘it’s okay to be gay’, ‘it’s okay to be who you are’, ‘we will still love you no matter who you bring home’.

I swear when I started writing this I hadn’t meant it to be so dark and woe is me. I just wanted to try and explain how I came to be here, writing a blog as a volunteer for Stop Hate UK. My story is one of the lighter, less soul destroying origin stories, I’m sure. Even so, the littlest of things has affected and shaped me and how I live my life now. I have never been assaulted, or disowned, or fired because of who I am and who I love, like so many other LGBTQAI* people out there. But still the stigma, the ingrained fear that society has instilled in me since I was very young – the shouts of ‘lesbians!’ out of car windows as if it was a bad word, an insult – even after five years of proudly being with my fiancée, I still hesitate when I go to hold her hand in public, still have to fight back the fear and hate.

And that’s why, when Rose, the Chief Executive at Stop Hate UK, gave me her card a few months ago now, I knew I wanted to be a part of this charity. I wanted to use all those experiences – take all my past pain and hope for the future and love for my fellow Queers – and do something meaningful with my time on this planet. I knew I wanted to do everything I could to help stop hate.

Karen Bradley, Minister for the Preventing Abuse and Explooitation writes letter of support for National Hate Crime Awareness Week 2015

National Hate Crime Awareness Week

 

All crime is wrong, but crime that is motivated by hostility or hatred towards the victim is particularly corrosive. It can have devastating consequences for victims and their families, and can also divide communities.

 

This is why I welcome Hate Crime Awareness Week 2015. It will be a great opportunity to show how we can work together to tackle hate crime.

 

As the Minister for Preventing Abuse and Exploitation, I have had the privilege of meeting representatives from a wide range of groups who work to tackle hate crime. I cannot overstate how much they do to challenge the attitudes that foster hatred and support victims. Whether it is the Community Security Trust offering security, protection and reassurance to the Jewish community, Tell MAMA helping victims of anti-Muslim hate crime through the justice system, or GALOP offering care to LGBT victims of hate crime, all of our stakeholders play a vital role in the fight against hatred.

 

Getting the response to hate crime right depends on local partnerships and collaboration. I congratulate all local areas who have organised events this Hate Crime Awareness week to promote local services and initiatives and urge them to continue the excellent work they are doing.

 

However, we know that there is still much to do. We know that more antisemitic hate crimes were reported to the Community Security Trust in 2014 than in any other year since it began collecting data in 1984, and this trend has continued into 2015. We know that the Metropolitan Police Service recorded more anti-Muslim hate crime in the year we saw isolated incidents in Paris and Tunisia and ongoing instability in Syria and Iraq. We know that there are people here in the UK who seek opportunities to divide communities and cause harm to those who they perceive as different.

 

This is why tackling hate crime is one of my priorities as a minister. Hate Crime Awareness Week is an ideal opportunity to reflect on the journey that has brought us to this point and consider how we continue our progress in the fight against hate crime. We should not forget the victims in this fight.

 

We need your help too, because without your reports, we do not know where incidents are happening, or the true scale of the problem. Please come forward and report any incidents to the police, either directly or through True Vision at http://www.report-it.org.uk

 

Karen Bradley MP

 

Tim Farron, MP, Leader of the Liberal Democrats writes letter of support for National Hate Crime Awareness Week 2015

I’m proud to add my support to ‘No to Hate Crime Awareness Week’ and the work of all the organisations who have come together to build better and safer communities.

 

No-one in our society should be threatened, targeted, attacked or abused for being who they are.

 

It is the duty of community leaders, elected officials like me, and those in a position of public power and influence to lead the way.

 

Britain celebrates diversity and individuality, and I believe we should all work together to build a society where everyone can live freely and safely, regardless of race, religion, sex, sexuality, nationality, age or disability.

 

For too long hate crimes were left to go unchallenged, with prejudice lurking on our streets, in our schools and in the work place. Weeks like this help us all remember the past, and also recognise how far we have come. Thankfully, it is through the vital work of organisations like yours that we are starting to turn the dial on public awareness. But more must be done. As the latest figures prove, hate crimes remain on the rise. We may feel that society is more likely to challenge prejudice, but it’s as prevalent as ever and now is not a time to be complacent.

 

There are thousands of people across the country, and many young people, who still face abuse and threats. It is our duty to pave a way to a better future. We will not tolerate hate crime, we will speak out against intolerance and ignorance, and we will prosecute abuse.

 

The Liberal Democrat constitution begins with a commitment to building and safeguarding a fair, free and open society. We champion the freedom, dignity and well-being of every individual, and we reject all prejudice and discrimination.

 

I wish all of those involved in #NHCAW great success with the week, and with your future campaigns. You all make a great difference to people’s lives, day in, day out, and for future generations. You have my party’s full support.

 

Tim Farron, Leader of the Liberal Democrats

 

Jeremy Corbyn MP writes letter of support for national Hate Crime Awareness Week

Message of support for Hate Crime Awareness Week

 

I want to pass on my support for this year’s hate crime awareness week.

 

Standing up against all forms of hate crime; Disability, Faith, Gender Identity, Race, Sexual Orientation and other emerging hate crimes, has always been core to my values. It is vital that we tackle all forms of prejudice wherever and in however they appear.

 

This year’s focus on raising awareness of Islamaphobic hate crime is particularly salient in light of the appalling murder of Mohammed Saleem as he made his way home from evening prayers last year. Despite all the progress we have made on equality issues Islamaphobia continues to be a daily challenge for too many in our communities. In order to truly be a society that accepts no barriers to talent and contribution we must challenge the often unpleasant and narrative that emerges too often amongst commentary on the Muslim community.

 

It is vital that we encourage all of those subjected to hate crimes to report their experiences, in order to both hold those who commit such pernicious actions to account, but also to empower those affected and demonstrate the confidence that we as society will not tolerate the actions of those who seek to divide us. I am particularly pleased that the work of Tell MAMA is being widely promoted throughout this week. I encourage all those subjected to Anti Muslim hate crime to share their experiences.

 

The work of hate crimes awareness week in bringing together so many community and faith events across the country is an vital example of demonstrating that this country expects better. It is particularly encouraging that the number of activities held throughout the week continues to grow and I would like to pass on my best wishes to all of those involved in making the week a success.

 

We must never cease in our battle to make Britain and kinder and fairer place. I urge you all to remember those who have suffered or are suffering today and join our tireless battle for change.

 

Jeremy Corbyn MP, Leader of the Labour Party